Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Professor Shikha Nangia Receives Grant to Study How Protein Modifications Effect Human Health

Shikha Nangia

Humans are made of over a million proteins that perform crucial functions to maintain life. These proteins, however, can bind to small molecules in our cells and perform various new functions.

Biomedical and chemical engineering professor Shikha Nangia and her research team have received a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation to better understand how the modification of proteins effects human health. They will  use computer modeling and simulations to study changes in protein structure due to the attachment of the small molecules.

“Our group has studied protein through computer simulations for more than eight years. This grant will allow us to focus on how modified proteins affect human health,” says Nangia. “The funding will allow us to investigate scientific questions that have not yet been answered.”

This multidisciplinary project provides an excellent opportunity to train graduate students with different academic backgrounds, such as engineering, chemistry, biology, and computer science. The project will provide scientific training to undergraduate students through a cohort-based approach that will engage a team of 5–6 undergraduates in a ten-week summer research project.

The project will focus on training a diverse community of students from underrepresented minority students for graduate school. Students will be equipped with research experiences, fundamental knowledge, and professional skills to transition to doctoral programs in STEM disciplines successfully.

Yaoying Wu

Lab/ Center/ Institute affiliation –

Bioinspired Institute

Areas of Expertise:

  • Synthetic Biomaterials
  • Peptide Assembly
  • Vaccine Design
  • Immunoengineering

The immune system is essential for many aspects of human health, such as, infections, autoimmune conditions, malignancies, and tissue regenerations. While the generations of immune responses are complicated processes that involves wide range of molecular and cellular interactions, many key aspects crucial for protective immune responses have been recently revealed, generating enormous opportunities for therapeutic interventions to greatly improve patient health. Various immune engineering strategies based on biomaterial platforms have shown promise in facilitating immunogenic materials trafficking, modulating cellular interactions, and more. My previous work has also demonstrated several approaches to engineer coordinated cellular and humoral immune responses for augmenting therapeutic responses. The research of our team at Syracuse is aimed at designing biomaterials strategies to delivering molecular stimuli in a temporal and spatial fashion for regulating immune functions. We are particularly interested in harnessing humoral immune responses for therapeutic purpose by regulating the cellular process involved.

Honors and Awards:

  • Duke Incubation Fund (Co-PI) 2019
  • American Chemical Society Excellence in Graduate Polymer Research Award 2014

Selected Publications:

•             Wu Y, Wen H, Bernstein Z, Blakney T, Congdon K, Sampson JH, Sanchez-Perez L, Collier JH, Multi-epitope supramolecular peptide nanofibers eliciting coordinated humoral and cellular antitumor immune responses, Science Advances, 2022 8, eabm7833

•             Wu Y, Kelly SH, Sanchez-Perez L, Sampson JH, Collier JH, Comparative study of α-helical and β-sheet self-assembled peptide nanofiber vaccine platforms: Influence of integrated T-cell epitopes, Biomaterial Science, 2020, 8, 3522

•             Fries CN, Wu Y, Kelly SH, Wolf M, Votaw NL, Zauscher S, Collier JH, Controlled lengthwise assembly of helical peptide nanofibers to modulate CD8+ T cell responses, Advanced Materials, 2020, 32, 2003310

•             Kelly SH, Wu Y, Varadhan AK, Curvino EJ, Chong AS, Collier JH, Enabling Sublingual Peptide Immunization Using Molecular Self-assemblies, Biomaterials, 2020, 241, 119903

•             Nelson CE, Wu Y, Gemberling MP, Oliver ML, Waller MA, Bohning JD, Robinson-Hamm JN, Bulaklak K, Castellanos Rivera RM, Collier JH, Asokan A, Gersbach CA, Long-term Evaluation of AAV-CRISPR Genome Editing for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Nature Medicine, 2019, 25, 427

•             Wu Y, Norberg PK, Reap EA, Congdon K, Fries C, Kelly SH, Sampson JH, Conticello VP, Collier JH, A supramolecular vaccine platform based on α-helical peptide nanofibers, ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, 2017, 3(12), 3128

•             Wu Y, Smith AE, Reineke TM, Lipophilic polycation vehicles display high plasmid DNA delivery to multiple cell types, Bioconjugate Chemistry, 2017, 28, 2035

Yi Zheng

Lab/ Center/ Institute affiliations:

BioInspired Institute

Areas of Expertise:

  • Stem cell-based human developmental models
  • Microengineered organ/disease models (organoids)
  • Single cell genomics
  • Microfluidics
  • Mechanobiology

Embryonic development involves extensive lineage diversification, cell fate specification, tissue patterning and morphogenesis. Identification of the features that enable robust interpretation of developmental signaling using in vivo samples is a significant challenge. Recent studies of self-assembly processes of organ-like structures (organoids) from pluripotent stem cells in vitro have provided fresh insights into fundamental mechanisms underlying embryonic development. These stem cell-based in vitro models offer unparalleled opportunities for experimental control of key parameters, quantitative measurements, and mathematical modeling.

My lab sought to leverage sophisticated engineering approaches to achieve controllable in vitro platforms that could recapitulate sequential developmental events during human embryo development. These stem cell-based models will provide powerful experimental platforms to advance understanding of poorly understood embryonic disorders. With superior controllability and scalability, these platforms will also serve as effective tools for high-throughput drug and toxicity screening to facilitate diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of teratogenesis and birth defects.

Honors and Awards:

  • Robert M. Caddell Memorial Award, University of Michigan
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) CREATE Scholarships, University of Toronto
  • Barbara and Frank Milligan Fellowships, University of Toronto

Selected Publications:

  • Zheng Y, Yan RZ, Kobayashi M, Xiang L, Yang R, Goedel A, Kang Y, Xue X, Esfahani SN, Liu Y, Resto Irizarry AM, Wu W, Li Y, Ji W, Niu Y, Chien KR, Li T, Shioda T, Fu J. Single-cell analysis of embryoids reveals lineage diversification roadmaps of early human development. Cell Stem Cell. 2022. In Press
  • Zheng Y, Xue X, Shao Y, Wang S, Esfahani SN, Li Z, Muncie JM, Lakins JN, Weaver VM, Gumucio DL, Fu J. Controlled modelling of human epiblast and amnion development using stem cells. Nature. 2019;573(7774):421-5.
  • Zheng Y, Sun Y, Yu X, Shao Y, Zhang P, Dai G, Fu J. Angiogenesis in Liquid Tumors: An In Vitro Assay for Leukemic-Cell-Induced Bone Marrow Angiogenesis. Advanced Healthcare Materials. 2016;5(9):1014-24.
  • Zheng Y, Chen J, Cui T, Shehata N, Wang C, Sun Y. Characterization of red blood cell deformability change during blood storage. Lab on a Chip. 2014;14(3):577-83.
  • Zheng Y, Shojaei-Baghini E, Wang C, Sun Y. Microfluidic characterization of specific membrane capacitance and cytoplasm conductivity of single cells. Biosensors and Bioelectronics. 2013;42:496-502.

Interdisciplinary team of Engineering and Computer Science Students Wins 2022 Invent@SU Competition

When searching a burning building for people who may be trapped inside, smoke and debris can cause firefighters to work in zero visibility conditions. They are attached to ropes but it is easy for them to become disoriented. This makes it difficult to navigate their way back to safety.

Environmental engineering student Oliver Raycroft ’25 heard about the problem from a firefighter during his first year at the College of Engineering and Computer Science and started thinking about ideas.

“I thought the problem was interesting and there was a clear need,” said Raycroft. “I wanted to help and find a solution.”

At the beginning of the six week Invent@SU program, Raycroft presented the problem to his teammates biomedical engineering student Alejandra Lopez ’22 and computer science student Adya Parida ’25. Both were interested in seeing if they could use their science and engineering skills to design a practical solution that would help firefighters orient themselves during rescue operations.

“If we could solve this problem, we could save the lives of firefighters and billions in damages,” said Parida.

During Invent@SU, student teams design, prototype and pitch new inventions with help from engineering and communications faculty. Each student receives a $2200 stipend and teams have a $1000 budget for prototyping materials. Teams spend six weeks developing their ideas during summer session one and each week a panel of Syracuse University alumni and friends evaluate the progress of their five-minute pitches.

“It was a combination of experimentation and feedback. This program taught me skills I can apply anywhere,” said Parida.

“I got better and better at presenting and communicating what we were working on,” said Lopez.

Raycroft, Lopez and Parida developed an initial prototype that would attach to rescue ropes and indicate directionality to firefighters who were working in zero-visibility. As they considered adjustments and materials for their next version, the team brought the initial prototype to the Oswego Fire Department to get their feedback and input.

“The fact firefighters liked it so much made it worth it,” said Parida.

On the final Thursday of the program, all seven teams in Invent@SU pitched their inventions to a panel of alumni judges. Raycroft, Lopez and Parida’s team named “Scale Sense” took first place and a $1500 prize.

Second place went to team “Wonder Walker” who designed a mobility assistance device for children with special needs.

Third place went to team “Silogix” – who designed a device to provide farmers with a way to prevent dangerous grain blockages in silos.

“It was a ride, it was fun, challenging and rewarding,” said Parida.

Several Invent@SU teams plan to work with the Blackstone Launchpad in Bird Library to explore business plans and patents.

Invent@SU was made possible by program sponsors Syracuse University Trustee Bill Allyn G’59 and Janet “Penny” Jones Allyn ’60 and Michael Lazar G’65. The 2022 team sponsors were Matthew Lyons ’86, Haden Land G’91 and Cathy Jo Land and Ralph Folz ’90. For more information on the program, visit invent.syr.edu.

Spring 2022 Engineering and Computer Science Dean’s List

Syracuse University Campus

In recognition of superior scholarship, the following students have been entered on the Engineering & Computer Science Dean’s List for Spring 2022.

To be eligible for Dean’s List recognition, the minimum semester grade point average must be 3.40 or higher, must have earned a minimum of 12 graded credits and must have no missing or incomplete grades.

Aerospace Engineering

Allyson Almeida

Brady Arruda

Curtis Cline

Bryan Collins

Nicholas Crane

Brian Cronin

Christopher Doherty

Michael Donato

Sean Edelman

Nadia Elsaeidy

Benjamin Faasse

Christian Fitzgerald

Victoria Forsyth

Benjamin Gerard

Alexandre Gill

Jacob Gomez

Zachary Haas

David Hadley

Alyssa Henley

Aidan Hoff

Paula Ibelings

Nicholas Jacobs

Joseph Javier

Sydney Jud

Benjamin Kane

Harrison Kayton

Trevor Knight

Isaac Lehigh

Stephen Leung

Emma Levenson

Maximillian Lipinski

Jacob Long

Powers Lynch

Brendan Marquis

Noah Martel

Elsa Martin

Jonathan Martin

Maxwell Martin

William Martin

Jason McElhinney

Mariana McManus

Parker McMillan

Alexander Metcalf

Romeo Michelson

John Michinko

Kendra Miller

Evan Moore

Matthew Murino

Mark Namatsaliuk

Tatiyyanah Nelums

Randall Osborn

David Pham

Madeline Phelan

Logan Prye

Matthew Qualters

Mykhaylo Rafalskyy

Samantha Riedel

Brandon Riley

Tracey Rochette

Alyssa Rote

Daniela Ruano-Pinos

Gregory Ruef

Michael Saksa

William Saueressig

Fred Schaffer

Winston Schaumloffel

Justine John Serdoncillo

Kanya Shah

Vraj Shah

Prabha Singh

Gregory Slodysko Jr

Zachary Stahl

Christopher Stawarski

Ethan Stocum

Yiyuan Sun

Marco Svolinsky

Tiffany Tang

Anthony Tricarico

Cody VanNostrand

Diego Villegas

Mason Weber

Timothy Wiley

Kana Wong

Cameron Woodbury

Melissa Yeung

Bioengineering

Anthony Acierto

Ashraf Alnatour

Bianca Andrada

Jason Bae

Eric Benaroch

Colby Black

Anna Brunson

Zeynep Cakmak

Britnie Carpentier

Lukas Cook

Tessa Decicco

Mia-Marie Fields

Tessa Galipeau

Jennifer Gonzalez

Skyla Gordon

Jenna Grutzmacher

Grace Haas

Lauren Hamilton

Victoria Hathaway

Brenna Henderson

Madeline Jones

Gabriel Khan

Jakub Kochanowski

Emily Labour

Quinn Langdon

Sara Leonardo

Isabelle Lewis

Alejandra Lopez

Ethan Masters

Aidan McCarthy

Aelish McGivney

Ian McHugh

Caitlin Mehl

Lindy Melegari

Katherine Monroe

Hannah Murphy

Alexander Musselman

Jonathan Ngo

Mark Nicola

Nicole Nielsen

Kerrin O’Grady

Mia Paynton

Megan Perlman

Connor Preston

Michael Presunka

Mark Ransbottom

Lillian Rhuda

Isabella Rosales

Brandon Salazar

Amira Salihovic

Juliana Sepulveda

Bridget Sides

Katherine Southard

Justin Stock

Elizabeth Su

Kimberly Tlayaca

Zhuoqi Tong

Danny Vu

Nathaniel Wellington

Maximillian Wilderman

Haven Wittmann

Lauren Woodford

Rui Xie

Julian Zorn

Samantha Zysk

Chemical Engineering

Daud Abdullayev

Paige Adebo

Lilly Basgall

Sandy Cao

Karley Chambers

Dennis Dao

Gabriela Duarte Saadia

Samantha Esparza

Emily Fittante

Edward Fluker

Mia Goldberg

Brent Gosselin

Avery Gunderson

Christopher Hansen

Oduduabasi Isaiah

Aiden Jacobs

Natalia Jarmain

Hope Johnson

Sonia Julius

Sayf Karim

Laxmi Khatiwada

Adam Klinger

Simran Dharmendra Lakhani

Caroline Leduc

Steven M Axelsen

Haonan Ma

Rawia F A M Marafi

Annika Meyers

Erin Odonnell

Sean O’Toole

Eli Paster

Fabiana Perez

Isabella Perkins

Nora Prosak

Riley Schmerber

Jacob Shellhamer

Jason Tan

Elizabeth Wall

Murphy Waters

Jackson Yuen

Civil Engineering

Shalom Acheampong

Juan Pablo Arosemena Graziadei

Maxwell Bell

Lucas Bellandi

Henry Bievenue

Ryan Bourdeau

Shalamar Brown

Alycia Bruce

Masson Bruening

Brett Carney

Vanessa Chica

Alejandro Correa

Aymeric Destree

Brendan Dwyer

Jack Dwyer

Marlee Ecton

Maraea Garcia

Matthew Hauser

Julia Johnson-Milstein

Joshua Kaufman

Kate Kemnitz

Alexander Klee

Adam Landry

Evangelia Larson

Abigail Laschalt

Haben Legesse

Emma Liptrap

Emilija Lizins

John Mazza

Jessica McGowan

Lucas Meiers

Sumit Mistry

Salma Mohamed

Amira Mouline

Trevor Napoli

Marissa Nicole

Jenifer Pena

Joseph Penta

Brian Perez

Justin Pettit

John Pham

Maxwell Pozar

Gabriel Prepetit

Anthony Privitera

Benjamin Putrino

Kaylin Richards

Cassie Saracino

Ethan Schulz

Aaron Shinn

Caitlin Spillane

Erin Splaine

Jose Venegas

Christian Viola

Christian Ward

Angelina Wong

Isabelle Wong

Paige Yamane

Charles Zeitoune

Garrett Zito

Computer Engineering

Adekunle Akinshola

Chikeluba Anierobi

Graciela Avila

Jackson Bradley

Collin Chamberlain

Dynasty Chance

Ibrahima Diallo

Lyn El Sayed Kassem

Melvin Escobar Gonzalez

Xavier Evans

Elizabeth Fatade

Delaney Glassford

Aidan Harrington

Ethan Hensley

Kasey Jackson

Mehak Jetly

Virkin Jimenez

Fundi Juriasi

Bikash Khatiwoda

Jessica Lat

Tyler Lavaway

Matthew Leight

Jiaxiong Li

Kyle Maiorana

Aksel Malatak

Jacob Masrouri

Jas Moreno

Benjamin Murray

Pierce Neubert

Jose Olivera

Jessica Reslan

Anel Rizvic

Samuel Rosenthal

Hongyi Ruan

Mia Russo

Hanna Salem

Alexander Segarra

Ryan Wolff

Renjie Xu

Andy Zheng

Computer Science

Aaron Alakkadan

Sajjad Albadri

Huda Ali

Christian Alves-Patterson

Garret Babick

Julia Barucky

Samantha Bastien

Anas Benhamida

Luke Bonenberger

Joshua Boucher

Brian Bourne

Ella Brink

Brandon Brushwyler

Bryan Bueno Reyes

Bryce Cable

Liam Calnan

Omar Camara

Megan Campbell

Benjamin Canfield

Jackie Chen

Lawrence Chen

Siyu Chen

Yixing Chen

Daniel Chmielewski

Season Chowdhury

Konstantinos Chrysoulas

Bram Corregan

Miguel Cruz Flores

Matthew Cufari

Ryan Czirr

Salvatore DeDona

Aidan DeGooyer

Alpha Diallo

Lucille Disalvo

Christopher Edmonds

Georges Elizee

Yassin Elsharafi

Ryan Elsinga

Matthew Faiola

Xueyan Feng

Bennett Ferrari

Lucas Fox

Mason Freer

Ruihong Gao

Brianna Gillfillian

Justin Gluska

John Gorman

Alexander Haas

Athanasios Hadjidimoulas

Talal Hakki

Ashley Hamilton

Jillian Handrahan

Liam Hannah

Nicholas Hoffis

Laurel Howell

Jacob Howlett

Xuanye Huang

Chengyi Jiang

Tianyiming Jing

Frederick Jones

Michael Jones

Alan Jos

Xiaoya Kang

Aarya Kaphley

Henry Katchuba

Matthew Keenan

Ekaterina Kladova

Polina Kozyreva

Gaeun Lee

Janet Lee

Justin Lee

Andy Li

Jiashu Li

Rick Li

Yuxuan Li

Daniel Lim

Haochen Lin

Sandy Lin

Zekai Lin

Huangjin Liu

Jiaming Liu

Joshua Liu

Yiheng Lu

Runzhi Ma

Gavin Macisaac

Andrew Markarian

Konnor Mascara

Kanoa Matton

Ryan May

Anthony Mazzacane

Matthew McDaniels

Noah Mechnig-Giordano

Jose Mendoza

Philip Moceri

Thomas Montfort

Jacob Morrison

Jovanni Mosca

Ryan Murphy

Zoe Neale

Christopher Nemeth Jr

Jillienne Ness

Arianna Nguyen

Cheryl Olanga

Carlyn O’Leary

Marissa Orsley

Daniel Pae

William Palin

Xiaofeng Pan

Michael Panighetti

Adya Aditi Parida

Brian Pellegrino

Carlo Pisacane

Daniel Pomerantz

Fiona Powers Beggs

Cheng Qiu

Shane Race

Christopher Rhodes

Eric Rodriguez

Sadikshya Sanjel

Jack Schmidt

William Seeley

Huahao Shang

Nolan Shepherd

Chad Smith

Jeremy Stabile

Kevin Sullivan

Cheng Yu Sung

Nicholas Sweet

Rae Tasker

Dylan Teare

Emmanuel Teferra

Jonathan Thomas

Eduardo Torres-Garcia

Brendan Treloar

Winston Tsui

Randy Vargas

Kevin Verdeschi

Kritika Verma

Bermalyn Maricel Vicente

Christopher Vinciguerra

Ruobing Wang

Xinyi Wang

Zijian Wang

Robert Ward

Jack Willis

Nolan Willis

Brian Wong

Ethan Wong

Tianyi Xiang

Zhuoyi Xiong

Yujie Xu

Jishuo Yang

Yongcan Yang

Stella Yaunches

Elin Yaworski

Yulun Zeng

Liaotianbao Zhang

Mingyan Zhang

Ruihao Zhang

Weiwei Zhang

Junjie Zheng

Liuyu Zhou

Xinqian Zhou

Yitao Zhou

Joseph Zoll

Engineering Undeclared

Luke Lybarger

Kathleen Meleski

James Peden

Emily Schiessl

Electrical Engineering

Minghao Ai

Mohammed Aljohani

Tianle Bu

Kevin Buciak

Wyatt Bush

Yushang Cai

Arianna Cameron

Leshui Chen

Nicholas Connolly

Kevin Donnelly

Henry Duisberg

Randy Galicia

Jose Ginorio

Jemma Mallia

Tyler Marston

Ryan Mussaw

Zixun Nian Nian

Jayson Okhman

Dylan Palmer

Julia Pepin

Matthew Piciocchi

Savion Pollard

Gilberto Ruiz

Gabriel Ruoff

Luis Santin

Jenna Stapleton

Jared Welch

Environmental Engineering

Elexis Jean Bishop

David Brodsky

Benjamin Cavarra

Ananya Chandra

Bessie Chen

Emma Crandall

Eric Fitzgerald

Eleanor Gettens

Allyson Greenberg

Brady Hartnett

Christopher Harvey

Joshua Higgins

Nicholas Kohl

Audrey Liebhaber

Samuel Livingston

Henry Long

Molly Matheson

Matthew Nosalek

Andrew O’Gorman

Ella Phipps

Scott Potter

Joshua Prygon

Oliver Raycroft

Mary Schieman

Noah Sherman

Husna Tunje

Jacob Tyler

Andrew Vanderwege

Maria Antonia Villegas Botero

Emily Vogel

Anna Wojcik

Qiuyu Zhou

Reilly Zink

Mechanical Engineering

Owyn Adams

Richard Andrews

Joshua Arndt

Timothy Arnold

Charles Ball

Erin Beaudoin

Aidan Bergman

Jeffrey Bernstein

Chloe Britton Naime

Brinley Bruening

Arnaud Buard

Alexander Callo

Joseph Capra

Graham Chapman

Talina Chipantiza

Artur Chuvik

Caroline D’Addio

Peter Daniels

Ryan Dileo

Madeline Doyle

Luyen Duong

Griffin Estes

Thomas Fabiano

Charles Germosen

Samuel Getman

Kara Gorman

Laura Graziosi

Jiayuan Huang

Vian Vishal Jain

Jagger Kachmaryk

Finnian Kery

Teagan Kilian

Justin Kohan

Deanna Koppenjan

Trevor Kroells

Harrison Liberto

Cameron Lotfi

Honorata Lubecka

Bei Luo

Lauren Mack

Kalhaku McLester

James Melitski

Leilah Miller

Pablo Morales

Nicholas Papaleo

Nathaniel Paradis

Corey Phung

Nicholas Piano

Scott Reyes

Aidan Riederich

Jasmine Rodriguez

Jeremy Rosh

Nitish Satpute

Justin Sauve

Eric Silfies

Dionysios Skaltsas

Nathaniel Slabaugh

Samuel Slaiby

Ian Storrs

Matthew Swanson

Ethan Tracey

Evan Tulsky

Alexandra Vaida

Nicholas Valentin

Griffin Vollers

Michael Wehrle

Taj Whitney

Michael Wong

Systems & Information Science

Connor Gurnham

Stacy Kim

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Professor Mary Beth Monroe’s Research Team Receives Multiple Awards at the 2022 Society for Biomaterials Conference

Biomedical and chemical engineering Professor Mary Beth Monroe attended the Society for Biomaterials (SFB) 2022 meeting in Baltimore with Ph.D. students Anand Vakil, Henry Beaman, Changling Du, Maryam Ramezani, master’s student Natalie Petryk ’21, G’22 and undergraduate students Caitlyn Greene ‘22, Grace Haas ‘23, and Avery Gunderson ‘23. This national conference included over 850 presentations from all over the world. The Monroe lab’s research abstracts and presentations were recognized in several competitions that took place during the conference, highlighting the excellent biomaterials work at Syracuse University.

Henry Beaman Receives a Ph.D. Student Award for Outstanding Research

Student Award for Outstanding Research: This is the highest student award that SFB gives, recognizing student researchers who have shown outstanding achievement in biomaterials research. Henry Beaman, a 4th year Ph.D. student, was one of two students selected in the Ph.D. student category. He was recognized for his work on shape memory polymer hydrogel foams with cell-responsive degradation mechanisms for Crohn’s fistula filling. Natalie Petryk was selected in the master’s student category. She was recognized for her work on tuning the interconnectivity of shape memory polymer foams using off-the-shelf foaming agents. Published manuscripts from both projects are featured in a special issue of the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research.

Natalie Petryk Receives an Master’s Student Award for Outstanding Research

Student Travel Achievement Recognition (STAR) Award: STAR awardees are selected based on abstracts by each Special Interest Group (SIG) within SFB to recognize research excellence with an aim of developing future leaders within SFB. Out of >850 abstracts, there are 25 STAR awardees and 25 STAR honorable mentions. Maryam Ramezani, a 3rd year Ph.D. student, received a STAR award based on her research on bacteria-responsive shape memory polymers. Caitlyn Greene, a senior undergraduate, received honorable mention based on her work on incorporating antimicrobial phenolic acids into shape memory polymer hydrogels.

Dr. Rena Bizios Poster Award: This award program honors Rena Bizios, a founding and active member of the BIoInterfaces SIG.  These awards recognize outstanding BioInterfaces research by graduate students. Anand Vakil, a 4th year Ph.D. student, received first place based on his work on temporally-controlled drug release from shape memory polymers. Natalie Petryk won second place in the competition based on her research on tuning foam interconnectivity.

Biomaterials Education Challenge: This competition involves presenting a poster with an educational module that is designed for middle school students. The objectives are to

  • Improve widespread understanding of biomaterials-related science and careers in the middle school population.
  • To encourage SFB student chapters to participate in K-8 outreach efforts.
  • Reward the communication skills and creativity of the next generation of biomaterials researchers and educators.

As representatives of the Syracuse University SFB student chapter, Maryam Ramezani and Anand Vakil earned 1st place in this competition for their presentation on using cakes to teach concepts about polymers and foam fabrication. This award provides $1,500 for our student chapter to use for further development of outreach activities.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Student Spotlight: Zhuoqi Tong G’22

Zhuoqi Tong is the 2022 Recipient of the Louis N. DeMartini Award for Outstanding Research.

Hometown:

Xuzhou, China

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

I have been an Academic Excellence Workshop Facilitator and the president of the BMES Chapter at SU. I’m also in the Math Club as well as serving as a student panelist on the Academic Integrity hearing panels. I also play bassoon in the Syracuse University Symphony Orchestra.

Favorite thing about BMCE:

My favorite thing about BMCE is all of the support I’ve received from faculty and friends in the department.

Favorite thing about SU:

My favorite thing about SU is the vast range of opportunities that exist to enrich my academics.

Plan after graduation:

I will pursue my PhD in Biomedical Engineering at The Georgia Institute of Technology, likely specializing in the subfield of immunoengineering.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Spotlight: Bianca Andrada ’22

Bianca Andrada is the 2022 Recipient of the Bioengineering Founders Award.

Hometown:

New York City

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

  • Dr. Pranav Soman Research Lab
  • President of Engineering World Health
  • President of Kappa Phi Lambda Sorority, Inc.
  • 3+ Resident Advisor for Engineering and Computer Science Living Learning Community
  • Honorable Mention Recipient for Invent@SU
  • TA for Invent@SU Summer 2022
  • Engineering Excelerators
  • Tau Beta Pi – The Engineering Honor Society
  • Mentor Biomedical Engineering Society
  • Food Recovery Network
  • Guest Services – Barnes Center at the Arch Recreation

Favorite thing about BMCE:

My favorite thing about BMCE are the faculty and staff. They have all been supportive of my interests, passions, and they ensured that my studies revolve around them. For instance, I expressed my curiosity in CAD Design to Dr. Yung. He was able to connect me with the Industrial and Interaction Design School so I can bridge together my interest in design and engineering.

Favorite thing about Syracuse University:

On the engineering side, I had the opportunity to be a part of a multitude of projects that provided opportunities to prove to individuals my depth, understanding, and skillset in biomedical engineering. On the social side, I love going to the Basketball Games with my friends. 

Plan after graduation:

After graduation, I will be obtaining a Master of Science in Robotics and Autonomous System at Boston University. My focus will be in medical and soft robotics.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Student Spotlight: Madeline Jones ’23

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering student Madeline Jones was selected as a College Marshall for the Class of 2023.

Hometown: 

Bristow, Virginia

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

Tutoring in ECS 221 (statics) and MAT 296 (calculus 2), Biomedical Engineering Society, Society of Women Engineers, Tau Beta Pi honors society

Favorite thing about BMCE:

I love how biomedical engineering has a wide variety of career opportunities and you have the ability to change peoples lives.

Favorite thing about SU:

I love the community Syracuse has created. You can never go anywhere without seeing at least one person you know.

Plan after graduation:

Go to graduate school to pursue an MS/PhD so I can do bench-to-bedside biomedical engineering research as a medical scientist with a focus in regenerative medicine.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Francielli Silva Genier Receives Chancellor’s Citation for Excellence in Student Research

Francielli Genier

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Ph.D. student Francielli Silva Genier received a Chancellor’s Citation for Excellence in the category of Excellence in Student Research (Graduate).

The award seeks to recognize members of the University community who have made invaluable contributions through commitment to scholarship and research that fosters new understandings of the world and creative responses to its needs.

Genier’s research focuses on next-generation batteries. Renewable energy, such as wind and solar, highly demands efficient batteries that can be available when the conditions are not ideal for energy conversion. Her research with Professor Ian Hosein aims to improve batteries by substituting the solvents in traditional devices for polymer electrolytes, creating safer batteries with high energy density. They are also studying sodium-ion batteries due to sodium’s high availability compared to lithium’s and lower cost. 

“The Department of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering is exceptionally proud of Fran,” said Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Department Chair Julie Hasenwinkel. “She is an outstanding choice for the Chancellor’s Citation for Excellence in Student Research. Fran’s work on next generation battery technology is highly innovative and has the potential for broad impact in the field of renewable energy.”

Kirthiga Reddy G’95 Announced as 2022 College of Engineering and Computer Science Convocation Keynote Speaker

Kirthiga Reddy G’95 has many firsts to her credit. She was the first female investing partner at SoftBank Vision Fund, the first employee for Facebook in India & their Managing Director for Facebook India & South Asia. She is currently the president of Athena Technology II SPAC and a founding investment partner for f7 Ventures. She is on the Board of WeWork and Pear Therapeutics. Reddy received a master’s degree in Computer Engineering in 1995 and the College of Engineering and Computer Science is proud to announce she will be the keynote speaker at the College’s 2022 Convocation on May 14th.

Reddy brings over twenty years of experience leading technology-driven transformations. She is driven by the mantra “When businesses succeed, livelihoods flourish.”

Athena Technology II is an all-women-led SPAC (Special Purpose Acquisition Company) which brings talent and transaction experience to enable access to equity capital markets. The f7 Seed Fund’s mission is “Bold Women Investing in Bold Ventures.” Previously, Reddy was the Investment Partner at SoftBank Investment Advisers, manager of the $100B+ SoftBank Vision Fund where she led a portfolio of $5 Billion-plus. Her focus was fast evolving sectors like quantum computing, additive manufacturing, enterprise, health tech, gaming and crypto. She served on the investment committee of Softbank’s Emerge Program, a global accelerator to provide funding, tools and networks for top companies led by underrepresented founders.

Prior to SBIA, she was the Managing Director of Facebook India and South Asia for over six years, starting as their first employee in India. She started one of the global operations offices that now serves over 3.5B people. She grew the India business to several $100Ms of annual revenue and got investment buy-in for the vision of $1B. Her subsequent experiences at Facebook focused on emerging and high-growth markets including Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia, South Africa and the Middle East.

Reddy is a passionate supporter of Syracuse University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science. She has been an active member of the Dean’s Leadership Council since 2018 and is a member of SU’s Hill Society, a dedicated network of leadership annual donors who share a common goal of supporting Syracuse University’s highest priorities.

The newly established Kirthiga Reddy Graduate Scholarship Fund provides financial assistance to ECS graduate students.

She holds an MBA from Stanford University, where she graduated with highest honors as an Arjay Miller Scholar and has served as Chair of the Stanford Business School Management Board. She acquired her B.E. in Computer Science and Engineering from Marathwada University, India. She has been recognized as Fortune India’s “Most Powerful Women” and as Fast Company’s “Most Creative People in Business” among other recognitions. Her upcoming book, The Opportunity Engine, is about building high-growth, sustainable businesses.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Student Spotlight: Laxmi Khatiwada ’22

Laxmi Khatiwada received the 2022 Outstanding Achievement Award in Chemical Engineering

Hometown:

Syracuse, NY

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

Academic Excellence Workshop Facilitator and member of American Institute of Chemical Engineers

Favorite thing about BMCE:

The faculty members are very approachable and foster a friendly environment.

Favorite thing about SU:

The university has many opportunities and is close to home.

Plan after graduation:

Work in the industry for few years and pursue my graduate degree afterwards.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Student Profile: Maximillian Wilderman ’22

Maximillian Wilderman ’22 was the 2022 Recipient of the ECS Alumni Association Service Award.

Hometown:

Incline Village, NV

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

I’ve been involved with research in Dr. Soman’s lab, Engineering Ambassadors (current Program Coordinator), Biomedical Engineering Society, SUVO (current Vice President), and Excelerators.

Favorite thing about BMCE:

My favorite thing about BMCE is how accessible the department engages undergraduate students in research. I have gained so many out of class skills through research and have learned so much from my mentors.

Favorite thing about SU:

I would say the number of opportunities the university has to offer for its students. Ever since I stepped onto this campus, I wanted to take up every opportunity I could get and have learned something about myself after each one.

Plan after graduation:

After graduation, I will be returning to Syracuse for my masters in Bioengineering.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Profile: Francielli Genier

Francielli Genier received the 2022 Outstanding Graduate Student in Chemical Engineering Award.

Hometown:

Vitoria-ES, Brazil

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

WiSE women in STEM

Mentor of WiSE women of color in STEM program

E-board of Black Graduate Student Association (BGSA)

Favorite thing about BMCE:

Friendly environment among faculty and students.

Favorite thing about SU:

How alive the quad feels on spring days.

Plan after graduation:

Industry position in material science and engineering.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Student Spotlight: Lindy Melegari ’22

Biomedical Engineering student Lindy Melegari ’22 was named as a Syracuse University Scholar and received the Karen Hiiemae Outstanding Achievement Award.

Hometown: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:
Doyle Research Lab

Manlius Fire Department EMT

Server at Texas Roadhouse

Crisis Textline Volunteer

First Year Players

The Mandarins

Phi Delta Epsilon

OttoTHON


Favorite thing about BMCE:

The staff has been one of the most incredible things about the BMCE department. I always felt so comfortable going to any of my professors for help, and they were always my biggest supporters if any of my endeavors.

Favorite thing about SU:

I have had the opportunity to take a multitude of diverse and interesting classes that I never in a million year would have thought I could have connected to my career. SU has enabled me to look at my professional endeavors with an open mind.

Plan after graduation:

I will be doing research in the Yale University School of Medicine in their Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging.

Electrical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Alumni Profile: Grace Lanni ’88

Great ideas often disappear into a chasm that exists between inception and execution. To help bridge that gap, Grace Lanni ’88 has an innate ability to communicate with an array of stakeholders, help entrepreneurs find clarity in their ideas, and turn them into solutions that help people. Her fluency in a diverse set of subjects and ability to adapt was apparent from the start of her time as a student at Syracuse University.

Lanni entered college on a full Airforce ROTC scholarship and chose electrical engineering and biomedical engineering as part of a dual degree, along with a minor in music. Lanni found Syracuse University provided her with opportunities and resources to pursue her differing interests.

“The professors were very entrepreneurial, and I leaned into that. I was able to work with a physician at Upstate Medical Center as a lab assistant and I had other internship activities so I could apply the stuff I was learning,” said Lanni. “I also got to join the jazz band and be part of a community of musicians.”

After graduating, Lanni accepted a position where she quickly learned she was uniquely effective at communicating between two key departments.

“I would sit with the engineers in the morning and then spend the afternoon with the marketing people to explain what it was the engineers were building, and how to sell and implement the products,” said Lanni.

Lanni admits she had more fun spending time with the marketing team, and it opened her eyes to a side of business she had never experienced. This was the first of several significant shifts Lanni used to chart her career. In her next job, Lanni got a taste for selling. Then she moved to California where she took a position at a small networking hardware company and helped them grow to 35 employees within a year. The next move was to Austin, Texas and into software sales at a startup, but suddenly her momentum was stopped. After two months of being in the role, Lanni arrived at the office to find the doors chained shut. The company had gone out of business. Lanni had moved to Austin with her kids, she didn’t know many people, and did not have a job. After briefly considering retreating back to California, Lanni made some calls to colleagues and started looking for projects. Six months later she had her own company.

At the time, companies were just beginning to move servers off site to colocation centers, but the software they needed to manage the new server set up didn’t exist. Recognizing a sound opportunity, Lanni drafted a proposal and became one of only two women to score million-dollar money from a tier one venture capital firm that year. This was Lanni’s first time working with a venture group, and she says although it came with new challenges, the experience made her want to help women entrepreneurs.

“I really didn’t have any experience in the venture community. I had some support, some mentorship, but nothing like today,” said Lanni. “One of the things I love to do is support other women who want to go into the venture community and that is why. I didn’t have the support. I didn’t know what to say. I didn’t know how to manage the money. Those are skills I learned.”

Lanni broke away to work on a new startup in collaboration with Dell engineers to develop and sell an early version of the tablet PC. Lanni booked the first order, signed up the first partner and the first distributor, and after seven years she decided it was time for another move. Healthtech allowed Lanni to enjoy bioengineering and entrepreneurship, but by 2016, she went all-in on digital marketing. Lanni went to her team and asked what they thought she should focus on, and they said, “you’re a personal branding expert.” In response, Lanni launched a new business called All About That Brand to focus on helping entrepreneurs tell their stories to attract their ideal customers.

Lanni is a pioneer in the branding influencer space. All About That Brand helped bring personal brand influence into the spotlight and it took off. The platform includes an award-winning podcast, an award-winning book, and it positioned Lanni as an influencer in marketing, personal branding, and customer experience. In February of 2020, Lanni was searching for a new opportunity to innovate, and her reputation led to an invitation to appear on the cyberbullying episode of “4 Days to Save the World,” a reality show that challenges groups of entrepreneurs to develop solutions for global social problems.

The eruption of COVID-19 nearly derailed any further participation with the show because Lanni needed to focus on managing disruption facing All About That Brand. When she notified the showrunners that she wanted to step away, they countered by asking Lanni to stay on board in a new role, associate producer. It may sound like a strange role for an engineer, but both engineering and producing require a similar way of thinking.

“You have a problem in front of you almost every hour of every day. It is 24 hours of problem solving to the emergency room level,” said Lanni.

Her engineering mindset made Lanni a natural fit and within six months she became the executive producer in charge of 4 teams responsible for recruiting show-ready entrepreneurs, sponsorships, and financing to bring the show to set.

“With all my business expertise, I was able to weigh in and work directly with the studio owner and creator. It was a wonderful, wild experience for 18 months,” said Lanni. “It was like going back to college. I loved college. I learned so many new things.”

While talking with entrepreneurs around the world for the show, Lanni would often hear about the causes that mattered most to them and why. Those conversations got her thinking about how to stand out in the increasingly crowded brand space and blend her complimentary roles as a branding influencer and executive producer with her passion for helping entrepreneurs.

“When you’re talking with really smart entrepreneurs about how to save the world, it’s pretty fun. I decided I wanted to be in the conversations about cause. I wanted to help my clients identify and lean into their cause,” said Lanni.

Cause branding became Lanni’s new lane, and her latest enterprise is called Giving Out Loud. It is a media program that focuses on helping entrepreneurs select a cause that aligns with their brand and helping them demonstrate care for that cause.

“If you’re in business and you want to interact with younger generations, figure out what matters to you and talk about it,” said Lanni. “Be in that conversation because that is where things are headed.”

In the simplest terms, Lanni is an entrepreneur who wants to help other entrepreneurs at every level. Including aspiring entrepreneurs at Syracuse University.

“I am a fan of the entrepreneurship focus at Syracuse University. I love being a judge for Invent@SU and being a mentor,” said Lanni. “Have a great time and realize it is a journey. What you’re studying today is more about the people in the room than what is on the page. Really celebrate those relationships.”

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Student Profile: Zheng Xiong

Zheng Xiong was a 2022 Recipient of the All University Doctoral Prize.

Hometown:

China

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

During my PhD program, I had been actively involved with various academic activities in engineering college, such as ECS research day, Syracuse Stevenson Lectures, 3-min Thesis, Graduate Dean Research Day etc. These activities are fantastic opportunities to let research student like me interpreting their technical works to audiences with various background.

Favorite thing about BMCE:

BMCE is well known for its Bioinspired Institute (Formerly Syracuse Biomaterial Institute). It is a multidisciplinary hub with professors from almost all STEM majors in SU, ESF and Upstate Medical. The collaborative atmosphere and research facilities are at top-level in US.  

Favorite thing about SU:

There were so many memories at SU, where you could always feel passion when you walk over quad. You could enjoy sunshine at summer, observe beautiful foliage at Fall, shove your snow at winter and find rebirth of new year at Spring. There are always activities every week, even every day. The most unforgettable moment is Syracuse basketball team killed Duke’s at the last minute in 2017. You can’t imagine how exciting it is.

Plan after graduation:

I want to continue my expertise in optics and optical engineering to improve people live through providing innovative technologies. I have been working in Science and Technology Division of Corning Incorporated since I graduated at 2021 summer. My role is innovating advanced laser processing systems for next-generation glass application in automobile, optical fiber, display, and consumer electronics businesses.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Student Profile: Xuyang Qin G’22

Xuyang Qin was a 2022 Recipient of the All University Masters Prize.

Hometown:

Shijiazhuang, China

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

Research in Professor Nangia’s group; the quick presentation and poster session for the Stevenson Biomaterials Day of 2021

Favorite thing about BMCE:

I love all the faculty and staff who are of great patience and kindness. Collaborations and bonds of friendship are tight in our research team.

Favorite thing about SU:

The view on the campus is always great, whenever from summer to winter. Facilities are well-established, not only for meals, snacks, clinics and exercises, whatever you need can be found and solved on campus. Really feel great to have so many precious memories in my study at SU.

Plan after graduation:

I’m going to pursue my Ph.D. in SU and continue my journey on research.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Student Profile: Natalie Petryk ’21, G’22

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Natalie Petryk ’21, G’22 was named as a 2022 recipient of the All University Masters Prize.

Hometown:

Berkeley Heights, NJ

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with:

As an undergraduate student at SU, I was an Academic Excellence Workshop Facilitator and the Activities and Events Chair for Relay for Life. I was also involved with Alpha Omega Epsilon, Engineering World Health, and Excelerators. As a graduate student, I am conducting research on shape memory polymer foams with clinical applications in wound healing and post-surgical tissue regeneration in Dr. Mary Beth Monroe’s lab. I am also a TA for Biomaterials and Medical Devices (BEN 468/668).

Favorite thing about BMCE:

My favorite part about BMCE is the incredible support of every professor in the department. They have motivated me in the classroom and inspired me through my own research.

Favorite thing about SU:

My favorite thing about Syracuse University is the opportunity to get involved with research early on. I discovered a passion for biomaterials research starting my sophomore year, which ultimately shaped my future career goals, and I have built upon that work as part of my graduate studies.

Plan after graduation:

After completing my master’s thesis this spring, I will be continuing my research journey here as a Ph.D. student under Dr. Mary Beth Monroe.

2022 Engineering and Computer Science Research Day Awards

2022 Research Day

We are happy to announce the winners from the 2022 Engineering and Computer Science Research Day held on March 25th, 2022.

Poster Competition

1st Place: Elizabeth Oguntade, PhD student in Bioengineering.

On-Demand Activation of Functional Protein Surface Patterns with Tunable Topography
Suitable for Biomedical Applications. Advisor: Dr. James Henderson

2nd Place: Natalie Petryk, MS student in Bioengineering.

Synthesis of Shape Memory Polymer Foams with Off-the-Shelf Components for Improved
Commercialization. Advisor: Dr. Mary Beth Monroe

3rd Place: Alexander Hartwell, PhD student in Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering.

Introduction of a Multilayered Cathode for Improved Internal
Cathode Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Performance. Advisor: Dr. Jeongmin Ahn
Honorable Mention: Saif Khalil Elsayed, MS student in Civil Engineering.
Modeling Self-Folding Hybrid SU-8 Skin for 3D Biosensing Microstructures.
Advisor: Dr. Zhao Qin


Oral Presentation Competition


Communication and Security Session

1st Place: Kai Li, PhD student in Electrical/Computer Engineering. Detect and
Mitigate Vulnerabilities in Ethereum Transaction Pool. Advisor: Dr. Yuzhe Tang

2nd Place: Xinyi Zhou, PhD student in Computer/Information Science. “This is
Fake! Shared it by Mistake”: Assessing the Intent of Fake News Spreaders. Advisor:
Dr. Reza Zafarani


Health and Well-being Session


1st Place: Yousr Dhaouadi, PhD student in Chemical Engineering. Forming
Bacterial Persisters with Light. Advisor: Dr. Dacheng Ren


2nd Place: Henry Beaman, PhD student in Bioengineering. Gas-Blown Super
Porous Hydrogels with Rapid Gelling and High Cell Viability for Cell Encapsulation.
Advisor: Dr. Mary Beth Monroe


Energy, Environment & Smart Materials Session

1st Place: Durgesh Ranjan, PhD student in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.
Porous nanochannel wicks based solar vapor generation device. Advisor: Dr.
Shalabh Maroo


2nd Place: Alexander Johnson, PhD student in Civil Engineering. Estimating Dry
Deposition of Atmospheric Particles by Rain Washoff from Urban Surfaces.
Advisor: Dr. Cliff Davidson


Sensors, Robotics & Smart Systems Session

1st Place: Lin Zhang, PhD student in Computer/Information Science. Adaptive
Sensor Attack Detection for Cyber-Physical Systems. Advisor: Dr. Fanxin Kong

2nd Place: Zixin Jiang, PhD student in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
Short-term occupancy prediction driven intelligent HVAC control. Advisor: Dr. Bing
Dong

Collaborative Partnership Between Syracuse University and Leading Research Universities Receives Presidential Award

Students walking to and from Carnegie Library in early spring

The GEM Consortium, a collaborative partnership between leading research universities and industry to help underrepresented students earn masters and doctoral degrees in STEM fields, received the 2021 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring.

Syracuse University has been a member of the GEM Consortium for almost 30 years. In the past 5 years, GEM Fellowships have been awarded to graduate students in the School of Architecture, College of Arts and Sciences, College of Engineering and Computer Science as well as the School of Information Studies. The number of GEM Fellowship applications from SU students is now in the top 10 among GEM member universities. Civil and environmental engineering Professor Dawit Negussey is the current Syracuse University representative on the GEM Consortium.

“The award recognizes the contributions of the GEM Consortium in providing a scalable path to STEM careers in academia and industry for underrepresented students,” said Negussey.

“I’m grateful for all of Professor Negussey’s efforts to grow our graduate education pipeline for underrepresented graduate students at Syracuse University,” said Peter Vanable, dean of the Graduate School. “To go from relatively little activity with the GEM Consortium to being a top 10 contributor of GEM applicants is a clear marker of our commitment to increasing the diversity of our graduate student population.”

Over the past 45 years, more than 4000 GEM Fellows have earned MS and PhD degrees in STEM fields. At present, the GEM consortium membership consists of 129 private and public national universities and 61 major corporations and research laboratories.

Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs Dacheng Ren Elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering College of Fellows

The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the election of Dacheng Ren to its College of Fellows. Ren is the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs at the College of Engineering and Computer Science, and Stevenson Endowed Professor in the Department of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering.

Ren was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the AIMBE College of Fellows for outstanding contributions to the understanding and control of bacterial biofilms and medical device associated infections. The College of Fellows is comprised of the top two percent of medical and biological engineers in the country. The most accomplished and distinguished engineering and medical school chairs, research directors, professors, innovators, and successful entrepreneurs comprise the College of Fellows.

“It is a true honor to join other outstanding colleagues in the AIMBE College of Fellows. Microbial biofilms cause persistent infections that respond poorly to antibiotics, such as those associated with implanted medical devices,” said Ren. “There is a lot to be done to address this grand challenge and I look forward to making more contributions.”

“This is a great honor for Dacheng who is not only one of Syracuse University’s most innovative researchers but a strong supporter and mentor to other researchers across our university. He has been remarkable in his capacity to continue leading a preeminent research program while supporting the College’s research and graduate student enterprise via his role as associate dean. We are proud to celebrate this recognition of his work,” said College of Engineering and Computer Science Dean J. Cole Smith.

AIMBE Fellows are regularly recognized for their contributions in teaching, research, and innovation. AIMBE Fellows have been awarded the Nobel Prize, the Presidential Medal of Science and the Presidential Medal of Technology and Innovation, and many also are members of the National Academy of Engineering, National Academy of Medicine, and the National Academy of Sciences. A formal induction ceremony will be held during AIMBE’s 2022 Annual Event on March 25.

Ren will be inducted along with 152 colleagues who make up the AIMBE Fellow Class of 2022. For more information about the AIMBE Annual Event, please visit www.aimbe.org. AIMBE’s mission is to recognize excellence in, and advocate for, the fields of medical and biological engineering to advance society. Since 1991, AIMBE’s College of Fellows has led the way for technological growth and advancement in the fields of medical and biological engineering. AIMBE Fellows have helped revolutionize medicine and related fields to enhance and extend the lives of people all over the world. They have successfully advocated for public policies that have enabled researchers and business-makers to further the interests of engineers, teachers, scientists, clinical practitioners, and ultimately, patients. AIMBE Fellows are committed to giving back to the fields of medical and biological engineering through advocacy efforts and public policy initiatives that benefit the scientific community, as well as society at large.

Fall 2021 Engineering and Computer Science Dean’s List

SU Campus
The Einhorn Family Walk stretches out in front of the Hall of Languages on a autumn day.

In recognition of superior scholarship, the following students have been entered on the Engineering & Computer Science Dean’s List for Fall 2021.

To be eligible for Dean’s List recognition, the minimum semester grade point average must be 3.40 or higher, must have earned a minimum of 12 graded credits and must have no missing or incomplete grades.

Aerospace Engineering 

Lucy Genevieve Adams

Allyson Almeida

Brady Joseph Arruda

Richard L Bruschi

Curtis James Cline

Bryan Collins

Nicholas Daniel Crane

Brian James Cronin

Christopher John Doherty

Michael Alexander Donato

Benjamin David Faasse

Kassidy Fields

Christian Scott Fitzgerald

Victoria Elizabeth Forsyth

Benjamin Daniel Gerard

Alexandre J Gill

Zachary William Haas

Alyssa Henley

Aidan Hoff

Matthew James Holmes

Paula Cristina Ibelings

Nicholas John Jacobs

Sydney F Jud

Hunter John Adam Knarr

Trevor Anthony Knight

Eleanor Jane Lawler

Isaac Alan Lehigh

Emma Lee Levenson

Maximillian Lipinski

Jacob Eric Long

Powers Craig Lynch

Brendan Michael Marquis

Noah Martel

Elsa Adrianna Martin

Jonathan Henry Martin

Maxwell Joseph Martin

William Armstrong Martin

Jason W McElhinney

Mariana C McManus

Parker Byrne McMillan

Alexander Timothy Metcalf

Romeo Michelson

John P Michinko

Kendra Teresa Miller

Evan Gregory Moore

Brendan Pierce Murty

Mark Namatsaliuk

Tatiyyanah Queen-Asia Hope Nelums

Jarod I Okamura

David Dang Pham

Logan D Prye

Nicholas Christopher Richard

Brandon Walker Riley

Tracey Josephine Rochette

Daniela Maria Ruano-Pinos

Michael Chandler Saksa

William J Saueressig

Fred Evan Schaffer

William Arthur Sennett

Justine John A Serdoncillo

Kanya Kiresh Shah

Vraj Shah

Prabha Singh

Gregory C Slodysko Jr

Zachary Michael Stahl

Ethan J Stocum

Jaime S Sued Jr

Yiyuan Sun

Marco Svolinsky

Richard A Tedeschi

Anthony R Tricarico

Cody Joseph VanNostrand

Diego Roman Villegas

Mason Alexander Weber

Kana Li Wong

Cameron M Woodbury

Melissa Yeung

Bioengineering 

Anthony Drew Acierto

Ashraf Tariq Alnatour

Bianca Louise Andrada

Jason Bae

Anna Mae Brunson

Britnie Jean Carpentier

Lukas Cook

Tessa Riley Decicco

Mia-Marie Fields

Katherine Ann Gardner

Jennifer Gonzalez

Skyla Gordon

Benjamin Michael Grainger

Jenna Grutzmacher

Grace Haas

Lauren Elizabeth Hamilton

Victoria Li Rui Hathaway

Brenna Henderson

Avinash Jagroo

Madeline Jones

Gabriel Khan

Olivia Lynne Kmito

Emily Elizabeth Labour

Quinn Patrick Langdon

Sara Anne Leonardo

Alejandra Eugenia Lopez

Ethan L Masters

Aidan Theresa McCarthy

Aelish McGivney

Ian G McHugh

Lindy M Melegari

Katherine Grace Monroe

Hannah V Murphy

Alexander Patrick Musselman

Mark Nicola

Nicole E Nielsen

Kerrin Anne O’Grady

Mia Dian Paynton

Megan Perlman

Connor Preston

Michael Steven Presunka

Gavin David Richards

Mia Elizabeth Russo

Amira Salihovic

Juliana Sepulveda

Bridget Yong Sides

Katherine Anne Southard

Justin N Stock

Elizabeth Tarami Su

Zhuoqi Tong

Rochan Jitendra Urankar

Hasan Usmanov

Edgardo Velazquez

Danny Vu

Carly J Ward

Nathaniel D Wellington

Maximillian Meier Wilderman

Lauren Margaret Woodford

Rui Xie

Julian Marcus Smucker Zorn

Samantha Yvonne Zysk

Chemical Engineering 

Adriana M Archilla

Athena Andrea Basdekis

Brigitte A Belanger

Sandy Ynhu Cao

Trinity Joy Coates

Dennis Dao

Gabriela Duarte Saadia

Sophia Elizabeth Figueroa

Emily C Fittante

Edward Coleman Fluker

Mia Angela Goldberg

Brent Tadao Gosselin

Avery Gunderson

Christopher Max Hansen

Aiden A Jacobs

Natalia Jarmain

Hope Irene Johnson

Sonia Julius

Sayf Karim

Laxmi Khatiwada

Adam J Klinger

Simran Dharmendra Lakhani

Caroline J Leduc

Rawia F A M Marafi

Angela L Martinez

Sydney Rae Nowicki

Erin Marie Odonnell

Sean O’toole

Eli Irvin Paster

Daniel J Pelkey

Fabiana Nohelia Perez

Nora Swan Prosak

Ryan Gordon Ryersen

Riley Madison Schmerber

Jacob Matthew Shellhamer

Jason Tan

Elizabeth M Wall

Tyrese J Whyte

Jackson Richard Yuen

Civil Engineering 

Shalom Acheampong

Cassie Agren

Nicole Ayora

Maxwell Bell

Christian Balingit Bianco

Henry C Bievenue

Ryan Bourdeau

Matthew Emmet Brewster

Alycia Joline Bruce

Masson Bruening

David Coghiel

Alejandro E Correa

Aymeric P Destree

Kelly Diaz Rojas

Jack Dwyer

Marlee Ann Ecton

Stephen Goffredo

Elliane Reut Greenberg

Julia Ann Johnson-Milstein

Joshua Michael Kaufman

Jakob Lamond Keller

Kate Astrid Kemnitz

Alexander Gregory Klee

Adam Paul Landry

Evangelia Birget Larson

Abigail G Laschalt

Daniel Leyva

Emma Marie Liptrap

Emilija Alise Lizins

Erick Lojano-Quispe

William Ma

John M Mazza

Jessica M McGowan

Lucas James Meiers

Sumit Harshad Mistry

Amira Mouline

Mazin F Moya

Trevor Robert Napoli

Marissa R Nicole

Maxwell Robert Pozar

Kaylin Janet Richards

Alexander David Ruppe

Cassie Elizabeth Saracino

Yazbeck Thomas Sarkees

Juha Wesley Schraden

Aaron Presley Shinn

Caitlin Jane Spillane

Jose Arturo Venegas

Christian Viola

Angelina Maggie Wong

Isabelle Wong

Sarah Wong

Paige H Yamane

Sifei Zhu

Computer Engineering 

Adekunle J Akinshola

Chikeluba K Anierobi

Graciela Gicel Avila

Mergim Azemi

Kyle J Betten

Jackson Thomas Bradley

Carlon Brown

Dynasty Da’Nasia Chance

Kongxin Chen

Ibrahima Diallo

Lyn El Sayed Kassem

Melvin Ruben Escobar Gonzalez

Xavier Evans

Elizabeth A Fatade

Aidan Robert Harrington

Ethan Hensley

Kasey Jackson

Mehak Jetly

Virkin Jimenez

Benjamin N Johnson

Fundi Juriasi

Robert Nicholas Kashian

Bikash Khatiwoda

Jessica K Lat

Tyler Alexander Lavaway

Matthew B Leight

Jiaxiong Li

Nicholas Kent Magari

Kyle Maiorana

Aksel James Malatak

Jacob Stephen Masrouri

Isabel M Melo

Benjamin Hudson Murray

Pierce Austin Neubert

Jose L Olivera

Derrick Nana Yaw Osei Owusu

Alexander C Perez

Anthony Patrick Riello

Alfonso E Rivas

Daniel Rose

Samuel M Rosenthal

Hongyi Ruan

Zachary Joseph Starr

Declan Wavle

Ryan Wolff

Renjie Xu

Andy Zheng

Computer Science 

Aashutosh Acharya

Aaron Alakkadan

Labeeb Alam

Sajjad Abdullah Albadri

Huda A Ali

Anas Abdallah Hussein Alkhashroom

Joseph M Balascio

Simon C Barley

Giovanna Elizabeth Barsalona

Samantha E Bastien

Maxwell Robert Beam

Emma Bellai

Anas Ahmed Benhamida

Joshua Jordan Boucher

Brian Michael Bourne

Amanda Leigh Bowdren

Ella Maria Brink

Bryan Bladimir Bueno Reyes

Christopher Manuel Calderon Suarez

Liam M Calnan

Megan J Campbell

Chih-Chia Chen

Hong Yang Chen

Jackie Chen

Lawrence Chen

Runzhou Chen

Wenyu Chen

Yixing Chen

Yuhao Chen

Oscar Chi

Daniel Chmielewski

Season Chowdhury

Konstantinos Chrysoulas

Melissa Chu

Miguel Angel Cruz Flores

Matthew Cufari

Ryan Matthew Czirr

Salvatore DeDona

Aidan Christopher DeGooyer

Alpha Oumar Diallo

Lucille Jennifer Disalvo

Ting Dong

Christopher Edmonds

Yassin Mahmoud Elsharafi

Ryan Siebe Elsinga

Jair Espinoza

Xueyan Feng

Nathan B Fenske

Bennett Ferrari

Lucas Kuebler Fox

Mason Roy Freer

Evan Garvey

Grant Thomas Gifford

Brianna S Gillfillian

Justin Gluska

John Martin Gorman

Dayong Gu

Alexander Peter-Anthony Haas

Athanasios Hadjidimoulas

Ashley Marie Hamilton

Jillian Elizabeth Handrahan

Liam Gordon Hannah

Cameron Hoechst

Laurel Howell

Jacob Howlett

Jason Huang

Xuanye Huang

Yanju Huang

Chengyi Jiang

Tianyiming Jing

Frederick Jackson Jones

Michael Wesley Jones

Alan Jos

Lauren Keona Kaaiakamanu

Aarya Tara Kaphley

Maxwell Albert Kaufman

Matthew Keenan

Ekaterina Kladova

Joshua Jayvant Zachary Koshy

Krutartha Nagesh

Rami Lionel Kuttab

Janet Jihoo Lee

Maya J’Nai Lee

Jiashu Li

Ruowen Li

Yuxuan Li

Daniel Lim

Chengda Lin

Haochen Lin

Sandy Lin

Erxi Liu

Jiaming Liu

Joshua Zhou Liu

Junzhang Liu

Yuyuan Liu

Cayden Thomas Lombard

Kevin A Lopez

Yiheng Lu

Michael Fitzgerald Lupton Jr

Runzhi Ma

Hunter O’Neal Malley

Andrew Thomas Markarian

Kanoa Matton

Ryan M May

Anthony Louis Mazzacane

Matthew McDaniels

Noah Mechnig-Giordano

Philip Anthony Moceri

Thomas J Montfort

Aaron Masoud Moradi

Jovanni Nicholas Mosca

Chenxi Mu

Andi Muhaxheri

Zoe Anne Neale

Christopher Scott Nemeth Jr

Jillienne Judith Ness

Arianna Kassandra Nguyen

Carlyn M O’Leary

Marissa Lynn Orsley

Daniel Pae

Xiaofeng Pan

Michael J Panighetti

Adya Aditi Parida

Zizheng Pei

Brian Joseph Pellegrino

Carlo Francesco Pisacane

Daniel Pomerantz

Fiona Colleen Powers Beggs

Cheng Qiu

Shane Michael Race

Raasin Amin Rahman

Alexis Hope Ratigan

Christopher Rhodes

Robert R Robinson

Eric Rodriguez

Sadikshya Sanjel

Jonathan Lee Schwenk

Huahao Shang

Andrew Shao

Nolan Lee Shepherd

Chad Thom Smith

Anthony Logan Solt

Dongzhao Song

Yijie Song

Hayden Christopher Spelbring

Jeremy P Stabile

Kevin Sullivan

Nicholas P Sweet

Louanges Essohana Marlene Takou-Ayaoh

Jonathan Richard Constantine Templeton

Jonathan Ezra Thomas

Eduardo Torres-Garcia

Winston Tsui

Randy C Vargas

Kevin Anthony Verdeschi

Kritika Verma

Christopher Mark Vinciguerra

Lihan Wang

Ruobing Wang

Xinyi Wang

Zijian  Wang

Robert Ward

Jack Andrew Willis

Sarah Grace Wlodkoski

Ethan Wong

Zongxiu Wu

Zhuoyi Xiong

Yujie Xu

Jishuo Yang

Yisheng Yang

Yongcan Yang

Stella R Yaunches

Yulun Zeng

Liaotianbao Zhang

Mingyan Zhang

Rixiang Zhang

Ruihao Zhang

Weiwei Zhang

Zhiyuan Zhang

Haoyu Zhao

Jinchao Zhao

Junjie Zheng

Xiao Lin Zheng

Liuyu Zhou

Xinqian Zhou

Yitao Zhou

Yixuan Zhou

Joseph Patrick Zoll

Engineering Undeclared 

Sydney M Baylor

Thomas John Fabiano

Charles James Germosen

Alexander Joseph Hai

Juwei Lin

Luke Benjamin Lybarger

Kathleen Rose Meleski

Annika Daphne Meyers

James Peden

Justin Wayne Pettit

Emily Mae Schiessl

Abdullah Swati

Haoran Wang

Electrical Engineering 

Minghao Ai

Mohammed A Aljohani

Tianle Bu

Kevin E Buciak

Wyatt Glenn Bush

Vincent Alec Camarena

Arianna Maxine Cameron

Leshui Chen

Nicholas Shawn Connolly

Kevin James Donnelly

Henry C Duisberg

Randy Galicia

John Charles Garcia

Justin P Geary

Christopher Gill

Jose Ignacio Ginorio

Joseph Charles Jannello

Michael Matthew Kelly

Dong Kyu Kim

Yiwei Ling

Jemma Mallia

Liam Fuller Marcato

Tyler Sean Marston

Angel Antonio Medina

Lukas Allen Morris

Zixun Nian Nian

Jayson V Okhman

Dylan Palmer

Julia Pepin

Matthew Piciocchi

Francisco Rodriguez

Gilberto E Ruiz

Gabriel E Ruoff

Kayla Ann Saladyga

Jenna Mei Stapleton

Connor Christopher Sumner

Jared William Welch

Environmental Engineering

Tyler James Allison

David Michael Brodsky

Benjamin R Cavarra

Ananya P Chandra

Emma Crandall

Elizabeth Bryant Cultra

Eric James Fitzgerald

Eleanor Elizabeth Gettens

Brady E Hartnett

Christopher Harvey

Nicholas Colin Axel Kohl

Henry David Long

Molly M Matheson

Salma Valles Mohamed

Matthew Edward Nosalek

Liesel Marie Odden

Hennecys Darlene Perez Castro

Ella Hope Phipps

Scott M Potter

Yongfang Qi

Jasmine Victoria Rodriguez

Mary H Schieman

Hayley Shay Scott

Jacob M Tyler

Andrew Michael Vanderwege

Maria Antonia Villegas Botero

Emily Jean Vogel

Anna Wojcik

Savannah Marie Wujastyk

Qiuyu Zhou

Reilly Zink

Mechanical Engineering 

Owyn Phillip Adams

Joshua Carl Arndt

Timothy G Arnold

Charles D Ball

Arthur Barros

Michael James Battin Jr

Erin Beaudoin

Rachael O Beresford

Aidan Paul Bergman

Jeffrey Trent Bernstein

Chloe Marie Britton Naime

Brinley Bruening

Arnaud Buard

Alexander Joseph Callo

Joseph Timothy Capra

Jun Chen

Artur Chuvik

Cooper P Crone

Anthony Cruz

Peter M Daniels

Ryan Russell Dileo

Madeline Doyle

Luyen Duong

Andrew J Esposito

Luke Samuel Fink

Nicholas Andrew Frank

Elan Fullmer

Samuel Ryan Getman

Kara Ai Chun Gorman

Jiayuan Huang

Vian Vishal Jain

Jagger Kachmaryk

Dong Myeong Kang

Jeremy C Kang

Macauley J Kastner

Finnian James Kery

Teagan L Kilian

Cherry Kim

Carl Winston Rice Kjellberg

Justin Kohan

Deanna Summer Koppenjan

Savannah Mae Kreppein

Trevor D Kroells

Nathan Lemoine

Honorata Lubecka

Bei Luo

Lauren Mack

Ryan Patrek Martineau

Michael J McElroy

Ryan A Melick

James Patrick Melitski

Leilah Miller

Wiley Robert Moslow

Beau M Norris

Daniel Panchenko

Nicholas Joseph Papaleo

Nathaniel Ryan Paradis

Tanner Josiah Peck

Corey A Phung

Nicholas Patrick Piano

Alexander Richard

Aidan Riederich

Collin Roche

Jeremy Vinton Rosh

Jeffrey Ryu

Nitish Sachin Satpute

Justin Sauve

Shane Michael Sefransky

William Kaspar Sherfey

Zachary Ryan Shuler

Eric Silfies

Nathaniel Slabaugh

Samuel Theodore Slaiby

Ian Storrs

Matthew K Swanson

Ethan William Tracey

Evan R Tulsky

Alexandra Rose Vaida

Nicholas Valentin

Griffin Riley Vollers

Xu Wang

Michael David Wehrle

Justin H Westhuis

Taj Asim Whitney

Michael Wong

Systems & Information Science

Connor W Gurnham

Stacy Kim

Akshay Ram

Zachary Tyler Williams

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Professors Mary Beth Monroe and Pranav Soman Discuss the Future of Biomedical Research with WCNY’s Cycle of Health

SU Campus
The Einhorn Family Walk stretches out in front of the Hall of Languages on a autumn day.

Professor Pranav Soman and Professor Mary Beth Monroe joined WCNY’s Cycle of Health show to discuss current research at Syracuse University’s BioInspired Institute and how new materials could make a difference in the medical field.

Click here to watch their episode titled “Biomedical Technology.”

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Professor Lawrence Tavlarides Retires After Remarkable Academic and Research Career

After 40 incredible years at Syracuse University, biomedical and chemical engineering Professor Lawrence Tavlarides will retire at the end of the Fall 2021 semester. Tavlarides received his BS, MS and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Pittsburgh in the 1960s. After working several years at Gulf Research and Development Center as a research engineer in Pennsylvania and completing his academic studies at the University of Pittsburgh he went through the academic professional ranks at Illinois Institute of Technology for the 12 years from 1969 – 1981. Tavlarides then joined Syracuse University in September  1981 as the chairman of the then chemical engineering and material science department for four years and has continued as a professor. He has received numerous honors and recognitions for contributions to the chemical engineering profession, academia and society. Tavlarides has taught numerous courses in chemical engineering, nuclear engineering and biochemical engineering. He has supervised 45 masters of science students ( 31 at SU ), 34 doctoral students  (23 at SU), and 13 post-doctoral associates at SU over his career.  His contributions with students and colleagues to research includes 1 book, 18 patents, 163 research publications , 2 educational publications and over 300 presentations  at technical meetings and Universities. He was principle investigator of 70 research grants ( 53 at SU) over his career. Tavlarides was also a member of numerous committees on treatment of nuclear wastes for the US Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission  in the first decade of 2000. He is proud to complete his career at Syracuse University.

Engineering and Computer Science, Upstate Medical University Faculty Awarded National Institutes of Health Grant for Catheter Research Project

For the 75 million people who require a urinary catheter, urinary tract infections are a serious concern. Catheters are prone to colonization by bacterial and fungal pathogens, which causes antibiotic-resistant infections. An infection can also lead to pH changes in the urine and block a catheter due to stone formation with potentially fatal consequences. Catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) that are antibiotic resistant cause 13,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.

College of Engineering and Computer Science professors Dacheng Ren, Stevenson endowed professor of biomedical and chemical engineering and associate dean for research and graduate programs; Teng Zhang, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering; and Huan Gu, research assistant professor and Upstate Medical University’s Dmitriy Nikolavsky, MD, associate professor of Urology, were awarded an National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 grant for a project aiming to engineer a new urinary catheter using smart biomaterials to reduced catheter associated complications.

“Conventional antibiotics commonly fail to eradicate infections associated with medical devices because of the remarkable capabilities of microbes to colonize these surfaces and form drug-resistant biofilms. To solve this challenging problem, we need new strategies that can provide long-term protections. This R01 project gave us an exciting opportunity to do exactly that,” said Ren, the principal investigator of this project.

Ren’s lab has developed a new strategy designed to make catheters smarter and more resistant to infection. They successfully created micron-sized pillars with supermagnetic nanoparticles on the tip so the pillars can beat in response to an electromagnetic field generated using an insulated copper coil embedded in the catheter wall. By controlling the on and off of an electric current, they could turn the magnetic field on and off, and thus control the beating frequency and beating force of the pillars. This strategy (active topography) worked well, as these moving pillars prevented biofilm formation of multiple bacterial species by up to 99.9% compared to flat control surfaces. A prototype catheter with active topography remained clean for 30 days while the control catheters were blocked by biofilms of uropathogenic Escherichia coli within five days in an in vitro test with flow of a medium mimicking urine. Their study was published in a recent issue of Nature Communications.

Now Ren, Gu, Zhang and Nikolavsky will move forward and study the mechanism of infection control by such active topographies, and further engineer their catheter porotype for in vivo tests in this R01 project. By optimizing micron sized pillars on the catheter wall, they hope to develop a self-cleaning catheter that would be much safer for long term use.

“This strategy is inspired by the motile cilia in human airways that protects our lungs from foreign particles during respiration,” said Gu. “Thanks to the development in materials and surface engineering, we can replicate this defense strategy, make it more robust and adaptable, and apply it to address challenges such as biofilm-associated urinary tract infections in this project.”

Numerical simulations from Zhang’s lab and the collaboration with Nikolavsky in Upstate Medical University’s urology department are key components to the potentially groundbreaking work.

“Biofilms are highly complicated biological materials with active bacteria embedded in polymer networks. This poses challenges and provides opportunities to integrate mechanics modeling and simulations with well-controlled experiments to uncover the working mechanism and design principles of medical devices.”

Zhang has been collaborating with the Ren lab prior to this award and he is also a co-author of the Nature Communications paper.

If successful, the findings from this study may also help solve other infections that involve microbial biofilms, especially those associated with medical devices.

“I am very excited about this design of smart catheters, Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on catheters, stents and other implantable devices is an enormous problem in medicine,” said Nikolavsky.  “Creating such smart surfaces on catheters that would actively expel pathogens, could potentially prevent bacterial colonization, catheter-associated urinary tract infections and may save patients with chronic catheters from bladder stone formation and recurrent catheter encrustation and clogging. I expect this will improve medical care and have positive effect on quality of life for many patients and prevent some of the common urological emergencies.”

Indoor Air Quality

Indoor air quality (IAQ) is important to the health and performance of building occupants. BMCE researchers are conducting interdisciplinary studies to better understand the impact of contaminants on IAQ and human health and to develop better systems for IAQ control.

VOC removal through symbiotic microbe-plant interactions [Ren]

To improve IAQ, it is critical to remove volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) effectively from sealed buildings. Recent research has demonstrated the great potential of indoor plants and associated microbes for VOC removal. However, the distribution of microbes in such systems is unknown and a quantitative understanding of their activities is still missing. The lack of such critical information hinders the optimization and application of this technology. To better understand and improve such systems, we conduct a systematic study of VOC removal through symbiotic microbe-plant interactions. This project is based on collaboration with Dr. Jianshun Zhang in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering with funding support from the Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems. Experimental and modeling approaches are integrated to quantitatively analyze the system and optimize its efficiency.

Faculty

BioInspired Institute

BioInspired Syracuse supports research into complex biological systems, developing and designing programmable smart materials to address global challenges in health, medicine and materials innovation. It is an Institute for Material and Living Systems, focusing on four key areas: drug discovery, smart materials, form and function, and development and disease. BioInspired involves faculty from life sciences, engineering, physics and chemistry.

Faculty:

Introducing the Inaugural Patrick P. Lee Scholars in the College of Engineering and Computer Science

Lee Scholars

Syracuse University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science is honored to announce our inaugural Patrick P. Lee Scholars. The Lee Foundation’s largest scholarship program supports students at institutions of higher learning who are pursuing careers in engineering and other technical fields.

Joli Cacciatore is a fourth year Civil Engineering student from Niagara Falls, NY. Since arriving at SU she has been part of the ECS Ambassador Scholars program which conducts outreach to local middle schools to foster interest in STEM and provide positive educational role models. She is a member of the SU student chapters of the National Society of Professional Engineers, the Society of Women Engineers, and the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Stacy Kim is a fourth year Systems Information Science major from Staten Island, NY. She has several leadership positions in campus organizations including Vice President of the Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers and Community Service Chair for Kappa Theta Pi through which she conducted outreach to local high schools to help with the transition to online learning. Since 2019 she has worked for the Barnes Center in health promotion for her fellow students and during the pandemic has been helping administer and process COVID tests on campus.

Aymeric Destrée is a third year Civil Engineering major from San Marcos, CA. He is a member of the Ambassador Scholars program and enjoys working with children in the Syracuse public school system to introduce engineering concepts and problem solving skills through fun after school activities. He plans a career in public infrastructure and is particularly interested in transportation and urban design.

Olivia Kmito is a third year Bioengineering student from Bridgewater MA. She is a student athlete on the SU Gymnastics team and a member of the Alpha Xi Delta sorority and the Society of Women Engineers. She has a long term commitment to the March of Dimes organization inspired by a personal connection to their work. Following in the footsteps of her father, an SU engineering alum, she believes an engineer must value “integrity, leadership, and service” and most of all take seriously the trust that their colleagues, their clients, and the public place in them and their work.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Professor Shikha Nangia Selected as a Rising Star by the American Chemical Society

Biomedical and chemical engineering Professor Shikha Nangia has been selected as a recipient of the American Chemical Society’s Women Chemist Committee (WCC) 2022 Rising Star Award. The award recognizes nine women scientists who have demonstrated excellence in the scientific enterprise and outstanding promise for contributions to their respective fields.

Nangia will receive her award and present her recent research on the blood-brain barrier at the 263rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in March of 2022.

“Shikha is an amazing researcher and colleague. Her group’s computational work to understand the architecture of the blood-brain barrier is advancing our fundamental understanding of its permeability and has the potential to lead to advances in drug delivery to the brain,” said biomedical and chemical engineering Department Chair Juile Hasenwinkel. “The department is very happy and proud to see her cutting edge work recognized with this award.”

“This is a well-deserved honor for Shikha. We have known she was a rising star for a while here at Syracuse University and I am very happy to see her get this recognition from the American Chemical Society,” said College of Engineering and Computer Science Dean J. Cole Smith.

Pun To (Douglas) Yung

Dr. Yung has long been intrigued by the interfacing of microbes with engineering tools on a micro- and nano-scale. He is unravelling methods to rapidly assess the viability of superbugs and harness energy from extremophiles using a combination of electrochemical, optical techniques and MEMS devices.

Degree(s):

  • B.S. in Electrical Engineering (Biomedical Engineering concentration), University of California, Los Angeles, 2003
  • B.S. in Mathematics/Applied Science (Medical and Life Sciences plan), University of California, Los Angeles, 2003
  • Ph.D. in Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, 2008

Teaching Interests:

Dr. Yung is an advocate of a hybrid teaching and learning environment replete with project-based hands-on work, experiential activities and peer collaboration, a style departing from traditional top-down expository pedagogies.

Honors:

  • NASA Postdoctoral Fellowship, 2008
  • Vice-Chancellor’s Exemplary Teaching Award, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2012
  • Dean’s Exemplary Teaching Award, Faculty of Engineering, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2011, 2012
  • Outstanding Teaching Award, Department of Electronic Engineering, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Recent Publications:

  • Liu, Si Li, Wen Jie Wu, and Pun To Yung. “Effect of sonic stimulation on Bacillus endospore germination.” FEMS microbiology letters 363.1 (2016): fnv217.
  • Wu, Wen Jie, Si Li Liu, and Pun To Yung. “Realization of Conductometry on a Digital Microfluidic Platform for Real-Time Monitoring of Bacillus Atrophaeus Endospore Germination.” IEEE Sensors Journal 16.8 (2016): 2244-2250.
  • Tao, Wenyan, Yanqing Ai, Sili Liu, Cheuk Wing Lun, and Pun To Yung. “Determination of Alpha-Fetoprotein by a Microfluidic Miniature Quartz Crystal Microbalance.” Analytical Letters 48.6 (2015): 907-920.

Radhakrishna (Suresh) Sureshkumar

Degrees:

  • Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, 1996
  • M.S. in Chemical Engineering, Syracuse University, 1992
  • B. Tech. in Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, 1990

Experience:

  • Lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1996-97
  • Assistant Professor (1997-2002), Associate Professor (2002-2006), and Professor (2006-2009) of Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Visiting Professor, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2008
  • Visiting Professor, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, 2008
  • Visiting Professor, University of Porto, Portugal, 2008

Lab/Center Affiliation(s):

  • Multiscale Modeling and Simulation Laboratory
  • Complex Fluids Laboratory

Research Interests:

  • Complex Fluids
  • Soft Condensed Matter
  • Nanotechnology
  • Smart Materials
  • Sustainable Energy
  • Multiscale Modeling and Simulation

Current Research:

Sureshkumar’s current research focuses on (i) understanding the structure, dynamics and rheology of complex fluids and soft matter, and (ii) nanoscale science and engineering of functional materials and interfaces. Multiscale modeling and simulations as well as experiments are used to probe the response of complex soft matter and interfaces to external stimuli such as mechanical deformation caused by flow, chemical/thermal gradients and optical fields. Major ongoing research efforts target investigations of self-assembly and self-organization routes to robust nanomanufacturing of optically tunable interfaces with applications to efficient light trapping in thin film photovoltaics, self-assembly of nanoparticles with surfactant micelles and polymers, interactions of nanoparticles with cell membranes to assess their cytotoxicity, rheology of viscoelastic polymer solutions/melts, coherent structures dynamics in turbulent flows in presence of drag reducing additives, bacterial biofilm mechanics as well as signaling between bacterial and mammalian cells.

Courses Taught:

  • Chemical engineering methods
  • Multiscale modeling and simulation
  • Structure and rheology of complex fluids

Honors:

  • Invited Speaker, University of Delaware Chemical Engineering Centennial Seminar Series, Newark, Delaware (2014)
  • Keynote Speaker, International Congress on Rheology, Lisbon, Portugal (2012)
  • Keynote Speaker, European Congress on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences and Engineering, Vienna, Austria (2012)
  • Keynote Speaker, Lorentz Center Workshop on Flow Instabilities and Turbulence, Leiden, Netherlands (2010)
  • University of Michigan Competitive Sabbatical Grant (2008)
  • Royal Scottish Society of Edinburgh International Exchange Award, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland (2008)
  • Distinguished Speaker, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada (2008)
  • Invited Speaker, American Physical Society Annual Meeting, Baltimore (2006)
  • Invited Speaker, Materials Research Society Annual Meeting, Boston (2006)
  • Invited Speaker, American Institute of Chemical Engineering, Salt Lake City (2007)
  • National Science Foundation CAREER Award (1999)
  • ACS/PRF New Faculty Grant (1998)
  • University of Delaware Allan P. Colburn Prize, Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation in Engineering and Mathematical Sciences (1996)
  • University of Delaware Competitive Fellowship (1995)

Student Awards:

  • Graduate Student Poster Award (Mr. Tao Cong), Society of Rheology Annual Meeting, Cleveland, (2011)
  • Graduate Student Poster Award (Dr. M. Vasudevan), Society of Rheology Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, (2007)
  • Graduate Student Poster Award (Dr. R. Magan), Colloids & Surface Chemistry Division, ACS Annual Meeting, Philadelphia (2004)
  • Graduate Student Poster Award (Dr. R. Magan) Nanoscale S & E Forum, AIChE Annual Meeting, Austin (2004)

Selected Publications:

Sambasivam, A.V. Sangwai & R. Sureshkumar, Dynamics and scission of rod-like cationic surfactant micelles in shear flow, Phys. Rev. Lett., 114, 158302 (2015)

Dhakal & R. Sureshkumar, Topology, Length Scales and Energetics of Surfactant Micelles, J. Chem. Phys., 143, 024905 (2015)

S.C. DeSalvo, Y. Liu, G.S. Choudhary, D. Ren, S. Nangia & R. Sureshkumar, Signaling Factor Interactions with Polysaccharide Aggregates of Bacterial Biofilms, Langmuir, 31, 1958-66 (2015)

Estime, D. Ren & R. Sureshkumar, Effects of plasmonic film filters on microalgal growth and biomass composition, Algal Research, 11, 85-89 (2015)

Israelowitz, J. Amey, T. Cong & R. Sureshkumar, Spin Coated Plasmonic Nanoparticle Interfaces for Photocurrent Enhancement in Thin Film Si Solar Cells, Journal of Nanomaterials, Article ID 639458 (2014)

Kim & R. Sureshkumar, Spatiotemporal evolution of hairpin eddies, Reynolds stress, and polymer torque in polymer drag-reduced turbulent channel flows, Phys. Rev. E., 87, 063002 (2013)

Nangia & R. Sureshkumar, Effects of nanoparticle charge and shape anisotropy on translocation through cell membranes, Langmuir, 28, 1766-1771 (2012). Cover Article

Sangwai & R. Sureshkumar, Binary interactions and salt-induced coalescence of spherical micelles of cationic surfactants from molecular dynamics simulations, Langmuir, 28 (2), 1127–1135 (2012)

Cong, S.N. Wani & R. Sureshkumar, Structure and optical properties of self-assembled multicomponent plasmonic nanogels, Applied Physics Letters, 99, 043112 (2011)

Sangwai & R. Sureshkumar, Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Sphere to Rod Transition in Surfactant Micelles, Langmuir, 27 (11), 6628–6638 (2011)

Torkamani, S. Wani, Y. Tang & R. Sureshkumar, Plasmon-enhanced microalgal growth in mini-photobioreactors, Applied Physics Letters, 97, 043703 (2010); Highlighted in Nature, 466 799 (2010)

Vasudevan, E. Buse, D. Lu, H. Krishna, R. Kalyanaraman, A.Q. Shen, B. Khomami & R. Sureshkumar, Irreversible nanogel formation in surfactant solutions by microporous flow, Nature Materials, 9, 436-441 (2010). Commentary by M. Pasquali, Nature Materials, 9, 381-382 (2010)

D.G. Thomas, B. Khomami & R. Sureshkumar, Nonlinear Dynamics of Viscoelastic Taylor-Couette Flow: Effect of Elasticity on Pattern Selection, Molecular Conformation and Drag, J. Fluid Mech., 620, 353-382 (2009).

Trice, C. Favazza, D.G. Thomas, H.G. Garcia, R. Kalyanaraman, R. Sureshkumar, A novel self-organization mechanism in ultrathin liquid films: theory and experiment, Phys. Rev. Lett., 101, 017802 (2008)

Kim, R.J. Adrian, S. Balachandar & R. Sureshkumar, Dynamics of hairpin vortices and polymer-induced turbulent drag reduction, Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 134504 (2008)

C M. Vasudevan, A.Q. Ashen, B. Khomami & R. Sureshkumar, Self-similar shear-thickening behavior in CTAB/NaSal surfactant solutions, J. Rheol., 52, 527-50 (2008)

Pranav Soman

Degree(s):

Ph.D. Bioengineering (Penn State University)

Lab/ Center/ Institute affiliation:

  • BioInspired Institute
  • Biomaterial Institute

Areas of Expertise:

  • Optical printing
  • Bioprinting
  • Microfluidics
  • Organ-On-Chip
  • Tissue engineering

Nature’s marvelous ability to arrange proteins, sugars, and minerals from macro to nano scales has realized a wide range of ‘smart’ multifunctional structures optimized to satisfy specific environmental demands. Man-made manufacturing, however, is not able to match nature’s building capabilities. My central research focus is to develop new processing and printing technologies to create reliable models from single cell to tissue scale to capture key aspects of in vivo physiology and pathophysiology. Toward this goal, my group, with expertise in mechanical engineering, laser optics, biomaterials and cell biology, has developed a technology toolbox to process and print biocompatible thermoplastics, photosensitive hydrogels, and living cells and provide a manufacturing solution to advance research in bioprinting, microfluidics, organ-on-chip, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and single cell analysis.

Honors and Awards:

  • 2022           The U.S. Air Force Research Lab Summer Faculty Fellowship Program
  • 2021           Satish Dhawan Visiting Chair Professor at the Indian Institute of Science
  • 2020           Techconnect Defense Innovation Award
  • 2020           E&T Outstanding Innovation in the Manufacturing 4.0
  • 2015  Syracuse University – College of Engineering and Computer Science Award for Faculty Excellence
  • 2010           Dean’s award for academic excellent, Penn State University.
  • 2015            Faculty Excellent Award, Syracuse University

Selected Publications:

Xiong, Z., Kunwar, P., & Soman, P. (2021). Hydrogel‐Based Diffractive Optical Elements (hDOEs) Using Rapid Digital Photopatterning. Advanced optical materials, 9(2), 2001217.

Kunwar, P., Jannini, A.V.S., Xiong, Z., Ransbottom, M.J., Perkins, J.S., Henderson, J.H., Hasenwinkel, J.M. and Soman, P., 2019. High-resolution 3D printing of stretchable hydrogel structures using optical projection lithography. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Kunwar, P., Xiong, Z., Zhu, Y., Li, H., Filip, A. and Soman, P., 2019. Hybrid Laser Printing of 3D, Multiscale, Multimaterial Hydrogel Structures. Advanced Optical Materials, p.1900656.

Xiong, Z., Li, H., Kunwar, P., Zhu, Y., Ramos, R., Mcloughlin, S., Winston, T., Ma, Z. and Soman, P., 2019. Femtosecond laser induced densification within cell-laden hydrogels results in cellular alignment. Biofabrication, 11(3), p.035005.

Sawyer, S. W., Shridhar, S. V., Zhang, K., Albrecht, L., Filip, A., Horton, J., & Soman, P. (2018). Perfusion directed 3D mineral formation within cell-laden hydrogels. Biofabrication. June 8.

Cindy Smith

Areas of Expertise:

  • Teaching Sports Engineering
  • Teaching Bioinstrumentation
  • Teaching Intro to Engineering and Computer Science
  • Teaching Engineering Computational Tools

I have been teaching various classes in bioengineering and general engineering for 8 years. I teach first year courses that introduce general engineering and computer science principles and the tools that many engineers will use. I also teach a senior level required course in Bioinstrumentation as well as a technical elective on Sports Engineering.

Honors and Awards:

Program lead for Invent@SU in the Summer of 2022.

Ashok S. Sangani

Degree(s):

  • Chemical Engineering PhD, Stanford University, 1983
  • Chemical Engineering MS, Columbia University, 1979
  • Chemical Engineering, BS, University of Bombay, 1976

Research Interests:

  • Particulate and Multiphase Flows
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Transport Processes in Biological Systems
  • Algorithms Particle Interactions

Current Research:

Particulate and multiphase systems are encountered in many natural, biological, and industrial processes. Their behavior is governed by physics at multiple length scales – from molecular, to typical dimension characterizing the individual phase boundary, to macroscale on which the microstructure is changing. Understanding of these systems in general can be improved through use of numerical simulations of appropriate phenomena at various lengthscales, theories for multiscale modeling, and experiments. Our research focuses on development of efficient algorithms for numerical simulations and theory. We apply these to variety of multiphase problems, and compare the predictions with experiments carried out either by our collaborators or available in the literature.

Teaching Interests:

  • Fluid Mechanics, Transport Phenomena
  • Thermodynamics
  • Transport in Biological Systems
  • Process Control
  • Applied Mathematics

Select Publications:

Sangani, A. S., Lu, C., Su, K., and Schwarz J. A., “Capillary force on particles near drop edge resting on a substrate and a criterion for contact line pinning”. Phys. Rev. E, 80, 011603-011617 (2009).

Ozarkar, S. S., Sangani, A. S., Kushch, V. I., and Koch, D. L., “A kinetic theory for particulate systems with bimodal and anisotropic velocity fluctuations. Phys. Fluids, 20, 123303-123319 (2008).

Ozarkar, S. S. and Sangani A. S., “A method for determining Stokes flow around particles near a wall or in a thin film bounded by a wall and a gas-liquid interface”. Phys. Fluids, 20, 63301-63316 (2008).

Five Questions with IBM Senior Vice President Bob Lord ‘85

IBM Senior Vice President Bob Lord

2021 Engineering and Computer Science convocation speaker Bob Lord ’85 is IBM’s Senior Vice President, Worldwide Ecosystems.

He is focused on ensuring the success of IBM customers, partners and developers using the company’s hybrid cloud and AI software as well as The Weather Company, which is an IBM business.

At the center of Bob’s work is a commitment to the open source community. He is responsible for IBM’s participation and leadership in dozens of open source communities; contribution and donation of open source code; and overall industry advocacy. A prime example is Call for Code, which Bob launched in 2018 to give developers and problem solvers access to IBM tools and technologies as a means to solve global, societal challenges. Since launch, over 400,000 developers and problem solvers from over 179 nations have built solutions for an immediate and lasting impact in society.

We asked Bob five questions about his experience at Syracuse and advice for current undergrads:

How did you know Syracuse University was the best place for your undergraduate degree?

From the moment I stepped on campus nearly four decades ago, I knew Syracuse was the place for me.

Without question it was the perfect undergraduate environment because it provided so many opportunities for me to discover what I was most passionate about. I wasn’t pigeonholed into one area of study at the tender age of 18, but rather was encouraged to take advantage of the many options available at SU. And without that breadth of exposure, who knows… maybe instead of speaking to new graduates of the College of Engineering and Computer Science this past weekend I might have become a dentist or criminal defense lawyer, which I explored as a freshman. SU helped me realize what I wanted to become, but more importantly allowed me to decide what I didn’t want to do.

What are some of your favorite memories from your time on campus as a student?

There are so many great memories. I’ll start at the beginning: move-in day my freshman year. My dad dropped me at Kimmel Hall alone for the first time in my life. But just as that reality began to set in, my new roommate arrived, followed by a slew of other new students. I quickly realized I was surrounded by people who were going through the same thing as me. That was the day I began to build some of the most enduring friendships of my life… friendships that remain strong to this day and I will be eternally grateful for.

It was also the day that I was first introduced to a population that was much more diverse than my Catholic neighborhood in Northern New Jersey. It was the beginning of my understanding of the power of diversity and inclusion. The more I learned from others, the more critical my thinking became and the more I grew as a human being.

How did your Syracuse experience help you in the early stages of your career?

I credit Syracuse for getting my career started. I was fortunate to be accepted into the engineering co-op program, so in the summers I would work at General Motors as a shift supervisor and engineer. Being immersed in that setting had a powerful effect on me. It validated that I was absolutely on the right career path, exposed me to a high-performance workplace, and gave me the relevant experience and confidence I needed to ultimately land a full-time position as an industrial engineer at Corning Glass Works.

I had countless experiences as an undergrad that equipped me to succeed in my first job and that I draw upon to this day. For instance, thanks to the rigorous and challenging course load that had me in Bird Library so much, I developed the skill of managing massive volumes of work, prioritizing what required immediate attention and developing a systematic approach to completing assignments.

What are some of the lasting influences Syracuse University has had on you?

That’s easy. I met my wife of 29 years, Robin, at Syracuse. Talk about a lasting influence! Both of my daughters also went to SU, and in fact my youngest graduated this weekend with a dual degree from the Falk and Whitman schools. I suppose you could say orange runs through the Lord family and I wouldn’t want it any other way.

I also attribute much of my development as a person and as a leader to what I learned during my formative years at Syracuse. It’s where the seeds of what I now refer to as a “growth mindset” were planted – something I strive to embrace in both my personal and professional life. It can be summarized by three core tenets:

First, be a problem solver, not a problem explainer. The world doesn’t need more people to talk about the problems we’re faced with; we need people who will take action. This was ingrained in me at the College of Engineering and Computer Science, where we were presented with problems and held accountable to finding solutions. And it’s why I’m so passionate now about initiatives like Call for Code.

Second, learn it all, don’t know it all. At Syracuse, I got a healthy dose of humility early on, and it became quickly apparent that I had SO much to learn. Once I accepted that, I experienced exponential growth, and I’ve committed myself to being a perpetual student to learn all that I can.

Third, be open and transparent. Some of the best development of my life has come from constructive criticism. It’s something I was no stranger to at Syracuse and I’ve found that accepting feedback as helpful guidance has gotten me a lot further than being defensive and viewing it as an attack. On the flipside, as a manager I take care to provide candid feedback to those around me so they may also grow.

What advice would you give to current engineering and computer science students?

I cannot emphasize enough to current students that they have a golden opportunity. They have the ability to take advantage of all this world-class institution has to offer, from renowned educators and facilities, to innovative programs and activities, and an array of courses and experiences. Seize that opportunity!

Go beyond your comfort zone, keep an open mind, and challenge yourself. Take electives that force you to learn something completely different and trigger another part of your brain. Explore ways you can get exposure to the industry’s best and brightest, like through the Blackstone LaunchPad & Techstars. Join clubs and pursue activities that pique your interest or that you’re even just mildly curious about because it may ignite a passion you didn’t know existed.

All of these things will contribute to the quest I encourage you all to pursue: to find your purpose, and to begin charting a path to develop skills you can apply in service of that purpose.

This is perhaps the only time in your life you’ll be able to partake in such a wide range of experiences in a condensed period of time. Don’t let it pass you by. Trust me, you’ll find yourself frequently drawing upon those experiences for years to come.

A Lifetime of Service: Remembering Dean Emeritus Bradley Strait ’58, G’60, G’65

Dean Emeritus Brad Strait

For many years Dean Emeritus Bradley Strait ’58, G’60, G’65 led the Syracuse University academic procession at Syracuse University’s commencement as the Mace Bearer. The Mace Bearer is a role that recognizes the importance of the University’s mission as an education institution. It was also a role that symbolized Strait’s relationship of more than 60 years with the College of Engineering and Computer Science, helping lead students, faculty, research and academic programs forward.

“Brad exemplified what it means to be Orange.  I do not know anyone else who commanded such complete respect across campus than he did,” says electrical engineering and computer science Professor Shiu-Kai Chin ’75, G’78, G’86.

Strait passed away in his hometown of Canandaigua, NY on May 6th, 2021. He leaves behind an unparalleled legacy as a student, professor and as dean of the College from 1981-1984 and again from 1989-1992.

He came to Syracuse University after serving in the U.S. Navy from 1951-1955 as an electronics technician. After being discharged, he studied electrical engineering. Syracuse University Life Trustee Charles Beach ’58, G’67 was his roommate and fraternity brother in Phi Gamma Delta. They remained close friends for the next 67 years.

“He really bled orange. He loved Syracuse University, he loved teaching and loved his students,” says Beach.

While he was an undergraduate student, Strait met Nancy Brown, who was a student in the University’s College of Fine Arts. Brad and Nancy married in 1957 and graduated in 1958. They moved to the Syracuse suburb of Jamesville where they raised their children, Andy and Martha. Brad and Nancy later established the Jamesville Museum which collected important pieces of the town’s history and memories of its neighbors.

After graduation, Strait worked briefly at Eastman Kodak before returning to Syracuse for a master’s degree and his doctorate. He then became a faculty member known for taking extra time to work with students and young researchers and making sure they were successful in all aspects of their life, not just the classroom.

He was a member of the university’s world-renowned electromagnetics research group and became chair of the then department of electrical and computer engineering in 1974. One of his early hires was current electrical engineering and computer science Distinguished Professor Pramod K. Varshney.

“Brad did a marvelous job in his role as the leader of a premier department,” says Varshney. “As department chair, he established a close relationship with the Rome Air Development Center (now Air Force Research Laboratory) resulting in significant research funded by US Air Force at Syracuse University.”

“Brad was my first academic advisor when I came to SU in the Fall of 1971.  He remained a near and dear mentor throughout my academic career,” says Chin. “His advice to me was always straightforward and direct. Always do what is best for the academic program, always teach a course even if you are in a leadership role and remember that the people you see on the way up are the same people you see on the way down.”

Strait went on to serve as the Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Science from 1981-1984 and 1989-1992. He was a relentless advocate and recruiter for Syracuse University, always looking to bring the best students and faculty to Central New York.

“Brad was one of the main reasons why I came to Syracuse University as a faculty member,” says mechanical and aerospace engineering Professor Ed Bogucz. “Brad’s personality was a big factor.”

In addition to recruiting for academic roles, Strait was always recruiting for the College’s softball team and a weekly basketball league.

“Many of the players, including myself, were young people who looked at Brad as a role model of how to live an active and fulfilling life balancing family, employment, faith and active recreation,” says mechanical and aerospace engineering Professor Alan Levy. “On the court Brad was a fierce competitor and, like all of us, he liked to win. But he was gracious in victory and defeat. Brad played in the game until he was about 80 years-old and he never lost his spark racing up and down that full court.”

Strait took pride in building connections across the university through softball games played against other colleges and departments.

“A lot of relationships were cemented by getting to know people during those games,” says Beach.

Always looking forward, Strait expanded collaborations with industry partners and worked to connect them with current research activity at Syracuse University. During his tenure as Dean, New York State designed the Centers of Advanced Technology (CAT) program and under Strait’s leadership the University received one of the 6 CATS. To make sure the center got off the ground, he left his Dean position and became the Founding Director of the Computer Applications and Software Engineering Center (CASE).

“He was instrumental in getting state funds to build the Center for Science and Technology (CST). Without his vision of CASE and his leadership, CST would not be built,” says Varshney. “CASE continues to flourish even today as a preeminent center that champions economic growth in the state of New York via its outstanding research activities with New York State.”

“When I became Dean of Engineering and Computer Science, I developed the concept for the Syracuse Center of Excellence following the approach that Brad had pioneered for the CASE Center,” says Bogucz.

Strait retired but always remained an active member of the Engineering and Computer Science family, serving as Dean Emeritus. He and Nancy also established the Bradley J. and Nancy B. Strait Scholarship to assist future generations of Syracuse University students.

He leaves behind a legacy of supporting and mentoring generations of young engineers and computer scientists. During a devoted life of service to Syracuse University, he provided guidance and encouragement at a crucial point in countless lives.

“I am forever blessed because he was part of my life. Those of us who are left must do our best to help the others who come after us like Brad did,” says Chin “Every time I am in the Dome during Commencement. I can still see Brad faithfully leading the procession as Mace Bearer guiding us to where we need to be.”

A memorial service at for Bradley Strait at Hendricks Chapel is planned for June 17th, 2021 at 5:00pm. A livestream of the event will be available.  

Biomedical Engineering Students Simulate COVID-19 Testing

Simulated COVID Testing in the Lab
As part of biomedical and chemical engineering Professor Dacheng Ren’s “Biological Principles for Bioengineers” class, students had the opportunity in their lab to simulate COVID-19 testing with a safe bacterial virus. “Essentially for this experiment we are replicating the PCR testing that is going on with the COVID Pandemic right now,” says bioengineering student Lily Rhuda. “We are working on viral detection so we are using polymer chain reaction and we are using a bacteriophage to mimic the coronavirus,” says bioengineering student Katie Southard. “So we are basically doing exactly what they are doing to test coronavirus samples.” “Each virus has RNA in it. So we are trying to see if that RNA is present,” says bioengineering student Assul Larancuent. “We are doing that by polymerase chain reaction. We are repeating that process again and again to see if that virus is present.” “We have run it through a spin column with a series of buffers to really isolate that material,” says Rhuda. “Then we use the centrifuge because that will bring all the buffer we don’t need out and leave the isolation we want.” “The repetition creates a process that makes it an accurate result,” says Larancuent. “You sort of see all the work that is behind COVID testing.” “It is really cool that we get the opportunity at Syracuse to do stuff like this,” said Southard. “It’s part of the reason why I choose this program at this school because I knew they would give me opportunities to do stuff like this with the latest technology.” “It has been a life changing class,” says Larancuent. “You got to see the real world connections between bioengineering and the actual situation we are having right now.” “This lab is a perfect opportunity to teach students advanced technologies related this ongoing pandemic,” said Ren. “Using a bacteriophage allows us to teach the principles and lab skills in a safe environment. I am proud that all groups successfully isolated RNA and conducted qPCR.”

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Profile: Siwen Wang

Engineering and computer science grad student

Biomedical and chemical engineering graduate student Siwen Wang was a 2021 Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award recipient.

These awards are reserved for teaching assistants in good academic standing who have made truly distinguished contributions to teaching at Syracuse University.

  • Hometown: China
  • BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: Member of AICHE
  • Favorite thing about BMCE: All faculties are so nice in BMCE. And I really enjoy the research environment in my group.
  • Favorite thing about SU: I like SU campus so much. You can find beautiful scenes when walking around the campus, especially in spring and autumn.
  • Plan after graduation: I hope to keep doing research in my current field.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Profile: Bowei Liu

Bowei Liu

Biomedical and chemical engineering graduate student Bowei Liu was a 2021 Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award recipient.

These awards are reserved for teaching assistants in good academic standing who have made truly distinguished contributions to teaching at Syracuse University

Hometown: Bengbu, China

BMCE/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: research in Jesse Bond’s group, AICHE conference oral presentation.

Favorite thing about BMCE: Students, TAs, and professors get to know each other and have close relationships. You can ask for help from any facilities and staff, they are always willing to do the best for you. The collaboration will always be available between research groups if another has the resources you need.

Favorite thing about SU: The campus is at its optimized size: big enough to have a wide range of diversities and small enough to have a strong sense of community.

Plan after graduation: find a post-doctoral position and continue to be involved in scientific research.

Wearable Dehydration Monitoring Device Takes First Place at Invent@SU 2021

Students in the Invent@SU Program

For the first few weeks of Invent@SU, physics major Paul Franco ’22, aerospace engineering student Zach Stahl ’23 and computer science student Anthony Mazzacane ’24 were not always sure their concept would work out. They had identified a clear problem – 80% of NCAA athletes had suffered from dehydration but finding a solution was not simple. They wanted to design a wearable device that could monitor an athlete’s hydration level so coaches and trainers would have better information and keep athletes safe – but would also need to prove their invention worked.

“We knew the scientific principle worked, but in the first few weeks we had logistical problems with the prototype,” said Franco.

As they pushed forward, they leveraged their different skill sets to solve problems with sensors, data collection and a prototype model.

“Being interdisciplinary forces you out of your comfort zone in a really good way,” said Mazzacane.

“Sweatration” was one of seven interdisciplinary teams of undergraduate inventors competing in the six week Invent@SU program. Before the first week of the program, faculty help form three-person interdisciplinary teams that balance different skill sets. Each team comes up with a concept for an original invention, research existing patents to make sure their idea is unique, develop a prototype and pitch it to weekly guest evaluators before “Shark Tank” style final judging at the end of week six.

The Sweatration team was concerned that initial evaluators were skeptical and knew they needed to back up their idea with hard data. They also met with a Syracuse University athletic trainer to gain their input.

“After every time we pitched, I wanted as much feedback as we could get,” said Franco.

The trainer was very supportive of the idea and didn’t believe there was anything like it that existed currently. As their pitch improved, the technical challenges were also being overcome. During a week five test of their prototype at the Barnes Center, the team saw it was collecting meaningful data – and their prototype could reliably show when the wearer was getting dehydrated.

“We had improved the prototype for a better fit and better connections for the technology inside,” said Stahl. “When I saw it was delivering data and consistently indicating dehydration I was thrilled.”

The notable alumni, entrepreneurs and innovators who served as final judges awarded the Sweatration first place and a $7500 prize. They plan on continuing with their invention and will work with both the Blackstone Launchpad in Bird Library and the Innovation Law Center as they move forward.

Second place at Invent@SU went to Ambiflux – a device that can both monitor asthma conditions and deliver medication.

“It felt good that we were rewarded for all the time and energy we put into this,” said bioengineering and neuroscience major Victoria Hathaway ’22. “It is an important device that is needed for a real cause.”

“To see that the judges saw what we saw – it was very gratifying,” said computer engineering student Aidan Mickleburgh ’23. Mickleburgh is also in the H. John Reilly Dual Engineering/ MBA program.

“It felt nice they appreciated the way all the concepts and elements came together,” said chemical engineering student Trinity Coates ’24.

The third place went to Sense-A, a monitoring and alert device that can help people caring for a family member with Alzheimer’s Disease.

“It was a great experience, different from anything else I have done in college,” said computer science student Hong Yang Chen ’22. “Building a physical prototype was a great challenge.”

“Good feedback from judges and evaluators was very helpful and they saw the difficulties caregivers currently face,” said chemical engineering student Simran Lakhani ’22.

“We are definitely going to move forward with this and work with Blackstone Launchpad,” said biomedical engineering student Gabriela Angel ’21 G’22.

Honorable mention at Invent@SU went to Glisten. They designed a device aimed at helping people monitor their dental health at home and provide pre-diagnostic information to a dentist.

“To be able to research, design and build a functioning prototype in six weeks is intense, but the expertise of the faculty and the evaluators made it possible,” said bioengineering student Bianca Andrada ’22.

“Our team was a good balance of different skills and perspectives,” said industrial and interaction design major Ahn Dao ’23.

“We have a passion to keep the world smiling,” said biology student Justin Monaco ’21 G’22.

Invent@SU was sponsored by Syracuse University Trustee Bill Allyn G’59 and Janet “Penny” Jones Allyn ’60, Dr. Deborah L. Pearce and William J. Sheeran ’60, G’63, G’66, Matthew Lyons ’86, Haden Land G’91 and Cathy Land, Ralph Folz ,90, Michael Lazar G’65 and Avi Nash G’77. For more information on the program, you can visit invent.syr.edu.

Steve Huang G’72, G’75 Establishes Memorial Scholarship in Honor of Syracuse University Mentor

Steve Huang

After rising to the position of vice president of engineering technology at International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF), one of the top priorities for Steve Huang G’72, G’75 was to build a culture that supported the needs of everyone in the company. Huang’s early career and experiences as a chemical engineering student at Syracuse University shaped a belief in the nexus between serving and a better society.

“You kind of change your life perspective,” said Huang. “I decided my focus will be trying to train and cultivate younger engineers and professionals in my company and creating the proper environment for them to grow and develop.”

Now as a management and technology consultant, Huang is scaling these core philosophies and finding new ways to serve gifted, young talent around the world. In honor of the man that once served him, Steve Huang has made a generous gift to establish the endowed Allen J. Barduhn Memorial Scholarship in Chemical Engineering.

“Professor Barduhn trained me and shaped me to become an engineer, but he also helped me on a personal basis,” said Huang. “I told him once, I look at you not just as my advisor, but almost like a parent. I respect him to such a degree.”

Barduhn had a profound influence, but it was the caring actions of foreign student advisor, Virginia Torelli that made Huang first feel welcome in Syracuse. Huang completed his undergraduate degree in Taiwan and a scholarship made it possible for him to pursue a graduate degree at Syracuse University. He arrived in the United States for the first time after five o’clock on the Friday before Labor Day weekend. To Huang’s surprise, Torelli waited to help him get settled.

“She stayed until everything was taken care of,” said Huang. “Even the service people at the dorm stayed to open the door and get me into my room. I could not believe that. My first impression was very warm, and it was a tremendous experience.”

Selflessness from others is at the center of Huang’s Syracuse University experience, most notably from Professor Barduhn.

“I was very, very fortunate. I had one of the best advisors I could ever have. Professor Barduhn really had patience and explained to us the purpose of research,” said Huang. “He really taught you how to work on problem solving. He wanted to train you, help you grow, and he wanted you to graduate.”

Barduhn also had experience in industry which enabled him to prepare his students with knowledge and insight unobtainable from a textbook. The benefits and positive experiences stemming from Huang’s decision to attend Syracuse University were considerable, but it was what Barduhn did next that may have carried the most weight.

“Professor Barduhn had such good advice. He is a tremendous person,” said Huang. “Not only did he teach me how to make good engineering judgments, but he also helped me get my green card.”

Having a green card sponsor was key because it made it easy for Huang to take job interviews, many international students are not so fortunate. Barduhn hired Huang to work in his lab and helped him gain permanent resident status.

“He told me, don’t worry, you have a Ph.D. degree, stay, work for me, and at the same time he said he would apply for a green card for me,” said Huang. “I was only his student, but he was willing to do that. So, I got my green card from Doctor Barduhn’s application. That is a favor I can never return. I will always remember him.”

Huang also credits his time at Syracuse University as a big step toward learning how to develop cross-cultural relationships and working with a variety of people-a skillset that would become invaluable as his professional career took off. Huang initially wanted to be a professor, but Barduhn urged him to first go work as an engineer. Young and fearless, Huang accepted a research and development position with IFF in 1976. He was the first chemical engineer with a doctoral degree hired by the company and Huang took up the challenge to pioneer his position.

In the 1980’s while Huang was developing and implementing advanced control systems at IFF’s United States and European manufacturing sites, he collaborated with colleagues in legal, finance, and marketing departments to lead a game-changing expansion into China for IFF. Through the 1990’s business in China thrived and Huang’s global manufacturing responsibilities increased substantially. In 2001 Huang advanced to the role of vice president of global chemical manufacturing and he continued to help IFF grow by applying solid business models, including sales and operations (S&OP), and Systems Applications and Product (SAP) implementation. By the time he retired after 35 years, IFF had seen sales increase by 600 percent and become an industry leader worldwide.

It is not a coincidence Huang understands the impact of generosity and the right environment over time. The opportunities afforded to him by others prompted one good thing leading to another throughout his education and career. Ultimately putting him in a position to serve. A position he says he may not be in without a chance to attend Syracuse University.

“Every one of those small things adds up. I am very appreciative for the scholarship that I had. I don’t think I would have been able to come to the United States without it,” said Huang. “With this gift I hope we can stimulate our alumni to really spend some effort and resources to help with education to build a better society. People are our foundation. I was really happy that I was able to do this.”

Spring 2021 Engineering and Computer Science Dean’s List

In recognition of superior scholarship, the following students have been entered on the Engineering & Computer Science Dean’s List for Spring 2021.

To be eligible for Dean’s List recognition, the minimum semester grade point average must be 3.40 or higher, must have earned a minimum of 12 graded credits and must have no missing or incomplete grades.

College of Engineering and Computer Science Spring 2021 Dean’s List

Aerospace Engineering 

Zar Nigar Ahmad

Juanitta Acheampomah Bekoe

Justin Douglas Blowers

Madeline Constance Brooks

Richard L Bruschi

Jakob Samuel Bryant

Nishkreenchan Chowdhury

Owen P Clyne

Nicholas Daniel Crane

Brian James Cronin

Ryan Demis

Aleksandar Dzodic

Kaleb Jonah Eddy

Hans-Christian Esser

Jacob Fastov

Kassidy Fields

Christian Scott Fitzgerald

Benjamin Daniel Gerard

Alexandre J Gill

Sareta Rose Gladson

Jacob D Gomez

Hali Morgan Goodwin

Zachary William Haas

Aidan Hoff

Sydney F Jud

Hunter John Adam Knarr

Trevor Anthony Knight

Zachary Andrew Kubala

Thomas Matthew Lane

Isaac Alan Lehigh

Xinyu Liu

Powers Craig Lynch

Noah Martel

Maxwell Joseph Martin

William Armstrong Martin

Phillip Anthony Mazany

Mariana C McManus

Gian Ettore Mecca

Alexander T Metcalf

Romeo Michelson

John P Michinko

Vincent Anthony Miczek

Kendra Teresa Miller

Paul Robert Mokotoff

Evan Gregory Moore

Brendan Pierce Murty

Mark Namatsaliuk

Jarod I Okamura

Daniel Oluwalana

Randall McGinnis Osborn

David Dang Pham

Madeline G Phelan

Logan D Prye

Nicholas Christopher Richard

Brandon Walker Riley

Kip Risch-Andrews

Emily Muriel Rivard

Tracey Josephine Rochette

Andrew Douglas Rockafellow

Gregory Joseph Ruef

William J Saueressig

Fred Evan Schaffer

Justine John A Serdoncillo

Vraj Shah

Prabha Singh

Gregory C Slodysko Jr

Amanda Marie Stafford

Zachary Michael Stahl

Christopher Stawarski

Ethan J Stocum

Marco Svolinsky

Maria Tarulli

Richard A Tedeschi

Anthony R Tricarico

Cody Joseph VanNostrand

Nicklas M Vinci

Mason Alexander Weber

John T Whitney

Aliza Marie Willsey

Cameron M Woodbury

Melissa Yeung

Bioengineering 

Samantha Abate

Jordyn Danielle Abrams

Bianca Louise Andrada

Gabriela Angel

Colin J Babick

Eric A Benaroch

Paige Bencivenga

Ailla Frances Bishop

Anna Mae Brunson

Zeynep Sue Cakmak

Britnie Jean Carpentier

Jade Ashlee Carter

Elizabeth Ann Clarke

Mya R Cohen

Lukas Cook

Shane A Corridore

Linzy M Dineen

Anthony Mark Dragone

Alejandro J Durand

Jillian P Durand

Bailey M Felix

Mia-Marie Fields

Akweshie A Fon-Ndikum

Gabriela Renee Gonzalez-Beauchamp

Skyla Gordon

Grace Haas

Lauren Elizabeth Hamilton

Victoria Li Rui Hathaway

Brenna Henderson

Avinash Jagroo

Madeline Jones

Simran Karamchandani

Gabriel Khan

Mohamed F Khan

Sara Anne Leonardo

Isabelle S Lewis

Trevor Daniel Amnott Liimatainen

Xinyan Lin

Alejandra Eugenia Lopez

Ethan L Masters

Aelish McGivney

Ian G McHugh

Caitlin R Mehl

Lindy M Melegari

Connor G Mulligan

Hannah V Murphy

Alexander Patrick Musselman

Jeffrey Ng

Jonathan Ngo

Mark Nicola

Nicole E Nielsen

Matthew Evan Orlando

Megan Isabel Perlman

Natalie Marie Petryk

Connor Preston

Beatrice Elizabeth Reilly

Lillian Kilmer Rhuda

Gavin David Richards

Rebecca A Schaefer

Brielle L Seidel

Alyssa Shelburne

Adam M Spadafora

Justin N Stock

Elizabeth Tarami Su

Bearett Ann Tarris

Kimberly Tlayaca

Zhuoqi Tong

Edgardo Velazquez

Carly J Ward

Royce Robert Weber-Pierson

Nathaniel D Wellington

Maximillian Meier Wilderman

Haven M Wittmann

Lauren Margaret Woodford

Rui Xie

Alina Zdebska

Julian Marcus Smucker Zorn

Samantha Zysk

Chemical Engineering

Daud Ansarovich Abdullayev

Paige O Adebo

Keerthivanan Annadorai

Adriana M Archilla

Athena Andrea Basdekis

Lilly Basgall

Sandy Ynhu Cao

Karley M Chambers

Trinity Joy Coates

Olushola Coker

Hao Dai

Dennis Dao

Samantha Esparza

David Anthony Fikhman

Edward Coleman Fluker

Priya S Ganesh

Brent Tadao Gosselin

Hannah Grossman

Avery Gunderson

Oduduabasi James Isaiah

Aiden A Jacobs

Stanley Jimenez

Jake Tyler Jock

Sayf Karim

Laxmi Khatiwada

Adam J Klinger

Simran Dharmendra Lakhani

Gabriel Lipsitz

Nicole Helene Llewellyn

Rawia F A M Marafi

Angela L Martinez

Oliver Mutu

Thomas A O’Brien Jr

Sean O’toole

Fabiana Nohelia Perez

Seth Reed

Ryan Gordon Ryersen

Ivan Yankov Sarbinov

Jacob Matthew Shellhamer

Dakota Alexander Story

Jason Tan

Spencer T Tardy

Megan Varcoe

Briana Nicole Vlacich

Elizabeth M Wall

Connor Andrew Wescott

Melita Zejnilovic

Civil Engineering 

Orges Agolli

Cassie Agren

Anna Rose Arcaro

Nicole Ayora-Gonzalez

Lucas Bellandi

John Blum

Luke S Bonenberger

Arielle Bramble

Matthew Emmet Brewster

Emma Jane Brown

Alycia Joline Bruce

Joli L Cacciatore

Brett M Carney

Trevor Caviness

David Coghiel

Alejandro E Correa

Aymeric P Destree

Thomas Driscoll

Brendan Dwyer

Bradley Charles Frederick

Maraea K Garcia

Stephen Goffredo

Elliane Reut Greenberg

Alyssa Jeannine Griffin

Bensen Gu

Shawn G Gulamerian

Zelin Guo

Matthew Paul Hauser

Qifan He

Catherine E Henn

Maxwell J Karl

Joshua Michael Kaufman

Alexander Gregory Klee

Christopher J Klein

Adam Paul Landry

Abigail G Laschalt

Haben Legesse

Daniel Leyva

Emma Marie Liptrap

Emilija Alise Lizins

Erick Lojano-Quispe

Lluvia Margarita Lopez Garces

John M Mazza

Jessica M McGowan

Amira A Mouline

Mazin F Moya

Marissa R Nicole

Erin E O’Brien

Kevin B Ordonez

Gabriel Jacques Prepetit

Svetislav Radovic

Alexander David Ruppe

Isabella Salgado

Cassie Elizabeth Saracino

Stephanie D Schein

Emma Hayes Schoonover

Juha Wesley Schraden

Ravyn Smith

Caitlin Jane Spillane

Adrian Stiefelmann

Alec Spencer Thompson

Anand Veeraswamy

Christian Viola

Nathan Viramontes

Abigail Meghan Wischerath

Isabelle Wong

Paige H Yamane

Computer Engineering

Chikeluba K Anierobi

Malkiel Asher

Mergim Azemi

Gavin M Beaudry

Kyle J Betten

Jackson Thomas Bradley

Jinzhi Cai

Dynasty Da’Nasia Chance

Yifei Che

Dana Marie Castillo Chea

Guoliang Chen

Hossain Delwar

Xavier Evans

Elizabeth A Fatade

Aidan Robert Harrington

Mehak Jetly

Virkin Jimenez

Benjamin N Johnson

Bikash Khatiwoda

Nicholas Gerard Lee Landry

Jessica K Lat

Matthew B Leight

Jiaxiong Li

Nicholas Kent Magari

Kyle David Maiorana

Isabel M Melo

Nicholas J Mohan

Benjamin Hudson Murray

Jose L Olivera

Jiannuo Pei

Jessica A Reslan

Alfonso E Rivas

Brian Rodriguez

Daniel Rose

Samuel M Rosenthal

Hongyi Ruan

Alexander Segarra

Ritwik Takkar

Shu Wang

Ryan Wolff

Hanyi Xu

Renjie Xu

Ziyun Zhang

Andy Zheng

Computer Science 

Aaron Alakkadan

Sajjad Abdullah Albadri

Kwaku Amofah-Boafo

Giovanna Elizabeth Barsalona

Brian H Belluscio

Dazhi Bi

Maxwell William Hans Bockmann

Joshua Jordan Boucher

Spencer H Bradkin

Bryan Bladimir Bueno Reyes

Bryce Cable

Christopher Manuel Calderon Suarez

Liam M Calnan

Megan J Campbell

Yuecheng Cao

Abby Chapman

Jackie Chen

Runzhou Chen

Siyu Chen

Yixing Chen

Yuhao Chen

Doung Lan Cheung

Season Chowdhury

Konstantinos Chrysoulas

Matthew Cufari

William Stuart Devitt

Ting Dong

Russell Carl Doucet

Nathan B Fenske

Evan Garvey

Grant Thomas Gifford

Brianna S Gillfillian

Brian J Giusti

Justin S Glou

Justin Gluska

Dayong Gu

Tighe Gugerty

Alexander Peter-Anthony Haas

Athanasios Hadjidimoulas

Erika R Hall

Andrew Hamann

Jillian Elizabeth Handrahan

Miranda Rose Heard

Wendy Hesser

Cameron Hoechst

Laurel Howell

Jacob Howlett

Natalie Huang

Xuanye Huang

Nathakorn Jitngamplang

Michael Wesley Jones

Jamed K Kamara

Jaehun Kim

Ekaterina Kladova

Gavin William Kline

Polina Kozyreva

Miksam Kurumbang

Rami L Kuttab

Eric C Lee

Andy Li

Jiaqi Li

Ruowen Li

Arvin Lin

Haochen Lin

Erxi Liu

Jiaming Liu

Jing Liu

Junzhang Liu

Steven Liu

Tiara I Logan

Vikas Gautam Lohana

Cayden Thomas Lombard

Yiheng Lu

Runzhi Ma

Hunter O’Neal Malley

Kanoa Matton

Ryan M May

Anthony Louis Mazzacane

Noah Mechnig-Giordano

Preston Mohr

Thomas J Montfort

Jacob Morrison

Jovanni Nicholas Mosca

Andi Muhaxheri

Paige C Mundie

Krutartha Nagesh

Zoe Anne Neale

Maduakolam Nicholas Onyewu

Maya Ostoin

Daniel Pae

William Anderson Palin

Xiaofeng Pan

Michael J Panighetti

Brian Joseph Pellegrino

Siwei Peng

Anthony Perna

Fiona Colleen Powers Beggs

Akshay Hari Prasad

Shane Michael Race

Lauryn Ashley Rivers

Eric Rodriguez

Sadikshya Sanjel

Jonathan Lee Schwenk

Benjamin William Smrtic

Louanges Essohana Marlene Takou-Ayaoh

Melissa Li Tang

Jonathan Richard Constantine Templeton

Jonathan Ezra Thomas

Kyra Danielle Thomas

Griffin E Timm

Courtney Patricia Tuozzo

Randy C Vargas

Bermalyn Maricel Vicente

Christopher Mark Vinciguerra

Puxuan Wang

Ruobing Wang

Xinyi Wang

Robert Ward

Daniel Weaver

Jonathan Williams

Ethan Wong

Yurui Xiang

Yujie Xu

Chen Yang

Jintao Yang

Jishuo Yang

Stella R Yaunches

Elin J Yaworski

Yian Yu

Yulun Zeng

Chengyuan Zhang

Liaotianbao Zhang

Rixiang Zhang

Weikun Zhang

Zhiyuan Zhang

Hang Zhao

Junjie Zheng

Liuyu Zhou

Xinqian Zhou

Raymond Zhu

Sida Zhu

Joseph Patrick Zoll

Engineering Undeclared

Olivia R Conlin

Michael J McElroy

Electrical Engineering

Minghao Ai

Rebecca Corrine Andino

Tianle Bu

Kevin E Buciak

Yushang Cai

Vincent Alec Camarena

Arianna Maxine Cameron

Yuang Cao

Brendan Robert Ciarlone

Eli Aiden Clark

Nicholas Shawn Connolly

Alex Lev Cramer

Trevonne Davis

Henry C Duisberg

Nicholas Fazzone

Justin P Geary

Matthew R Gelinas

Christopher Gill

Jose I Ginorio

Jack Orlando Guida

Emerson Iannone

Jemma Mallia

Liam Fuller Marcato

Tyler Sean Marston

Zixun Nian  Nian

Kylie Elizabeth Nikolaus

Dylan D Palmer

Julia Pepin

Matthew Piciocchi

Stephen Joseph Rogers

Gilberto E Ruiz

Gabriel E Ruoff

Kayla Ann Saladyga

Jenna Mei Stapleton

Jaime S Sued Jr

Jared William Welch

Ernest C Whitbeck

Abigail Wile

Chongfang-James Xu

Zheyuan Zhang

Environmental Engineering

Ana Cristina Baez Gotay

Luke M Borden

Benjamin R Cavarra

Bessie Chen

Evan James Cibelli

Cambre Rae Codington

Elizabeth Bryant Cultra

Cameron Nicole Edwards

Anna Feldman

Allyson Greenberg

Jessenia Paola Guzman

Brady E Hartnett

Christopher Graham Harvey

Anna M Holdosh

Erica G Jenson

Eva Rose Kamman

Abigail Rose King

Nicholas Colin Axel Kohl

Birch Lazo-Murphy

Audrey B Liebhaber

Samuel Robert Livingston

Carleigh Ann Lutz

Kevin A Lynch

Jiayu Ma

Nicole A Mark

Molly M Matheson

Steph Ricky Millan

Sydney Mitchell

Matthew Edward Nosalek

Scott M Potter

Yongfang Qi

Kaura Yanse Reyes

Jacob Thomas Sardino

Mary H Schieman

Noah Michael Sherman

Husna M Tunje

Jacob M Tyler

Maria Antonia Villegas Botero

Anna Wojcik

Savannah Marie Wujastyk

Yifan Zhong

Qiuyu Zhou

Reilly Zink

Mechanical Engineering

Owyn Phillip Adams

Arfeen Armaghan

Joshua Carl Arndt

Arda Arslan

Rachael O Beresford

Charles Shaw Bowman

Arnaud Buard

Ryan G Burns

Adrian L Caballero

Alexander Joseph Callo

Joseph Timothy Capra

Caleigh J Casey

Rishov Chatterjee

Samuel Joseph Corrigan

Cooper P Crone

David Matthew Denneen

Madeline Doyle

Andrew J Esposito

Cameron Barry Frechette

Elan Fullmer

Clinton Edward Farina Garrahan

Samuel Ryan Getman

Emily Ann Greaney

David M Griffin

Connor Hayes

Zhao Jin

Dong Myeong Kang

Jeremy C Kang

Macauley J Kastner

Daniel Jacob Kenney

Finnian James Kery

Teagan L Kilian

Cherry Kim

Jason T King

Savannah Mae Kreppein

Elizabeth Marcy Kretzing

Trevor D Kroells

Lily Larkin

Peter Le Porin

Honorata Lubecka

Bei Luo

Katherine Elizabeth Macbain

Lauren Mack

Ryan Patrek Martineau

Sarah Ann Michael

Georgios Michopoulos

Leilah Miller

Nicholas Mink

Wiley Robert Moslow

Allison Mullen

Beau M Norris

Aidan T O’Brien

Nicholas Joseph Papaleo

Corey A Phung

Pei Ren

Aidan Riederich

Jeremy Vinton Rosh

Jeffrey Ryu

Colin Santangelo

Nitish Sachin Satpute

Nathan Schnider

Shane M Sefransky

William Kaspar Sherfey

Zachary Ryan Shuler

Eric Silfies

Nathaniel Slabaugh

Owen Nicholas Smith

Ian Storrs

Austin James Sumner

Yiyuan Sun

Matthew K Swanson

Ethan William Tracey

Evan R Tulsky

Taj Asim Whitney

Michael Wong

Tszho Wong

Sean T Wuestman

Maxwell James Yonkers

Xiaoqing Yu

Antony Zheng

Systems & Information Science

Yiyang Dai

Jonathan Richard Deiss

Rodcliff Hall

Skyler Marie Hall

Luke Gregory Hedges

Stacy Kim

Niara A Phoenix

Nadia Olivia Shelburne

Zachary Tyler Williams

Dacheng Ren

Degrees:

  • B.E. (major) Applied Chemistry, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, P. R. China, 1996.
  • B.E. (minor) Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, P. R. China, 1996.
  • M.E. Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, P. R. China, 1999.
  • Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 2003
  • Postdoctoral associate, Chemical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2003-2005.

Lab/Center Affiliation:

  • Syracuse Biomaterials Institute

Current Research:

We have broad interests in Biotechnology, especially bacterial control. Historically, our understanding of bacterial physiology and development of antibiotics have been focused on planktonic (free-swimming) cells. However, the vast majority of bacteria in nature exist in surface-attached highly hydrated structures comprising of a polysaccharide matrix secreted by the bound bacterial cells, collectively known as biofilms. With up to 1000 times higher tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectants compared to their planktonic counterparts, deleterious biofilms cause serious problems such as chronic infections in humans as well as persistent corrosion and equipment failure in industry. Biofilms are blamed for billions of dollars of losses and more than 45,000 deaths annually in the U.S. alone. Despite the well-recognized significance of biofilms, the biofilm research is still in its infancy. With the efficacy of antibiotics and disinfectants being intrinsically limiting, new approaches especially those with synergistic effects are desired.

Compared to the deleterious biofilms, which cause serious problems in both medical and engineering environments, biofilms of environmentally friendly bacteria have promising applications. Due to their intrinsic tolerance to toxic agents, such biofilms may provide promising solutions to currently unmet challenges such as the high cost in biofuel production due to the low tolerance of microbes to fermentation products and difficulties in bioremediation of toxic contaminants.

In the Biofilm Engineering Laboratory, we have broad interests in biofilm research including genetic basis of multidrug resistance, biofilm control by engineering smart surfaces and biomaterials, development of novel biofilm and persister inhibitors, as well as biofilm engineering for biofuel production.

Courses Taught:

  • CEN551 Biochemical Engineering
  • BEN301 Biological Principles for Engineers

Honors:

  • Syracuse University LCS Faculty Excellence Award, 2014.
  • NSF CAREER Award 2011-2016.
  • College Technology Educator of the Year, Technology Alliance of Central New York (TACNY), 2010.
  • Early Career Translational Research Award in Biomedical Engineering from the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation, 2009.

Selected Publications:

For a full list of publications, please see http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=85Ty0hAAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao.

Fangchao Song, Hyun Koo, and Dacheng Ren. “Effects of material properties on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation” (Invited Critical Review). Journal of Dental Research. 94: 1027-1034 (2015).

Fangchao Song and Dacheng Ren, “Stiffness of cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) affects bacterial adhesion and antibiotic susceptibility of attached cells”. Langmuir. 30: 10354-10362 (2014).

Huan Gu and Dacheng Ren, “Material and surface engineering to control bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation: a review of recent advances”. Frontiers of Chemical Science & Engineering (Invited Review). 8: 20-33 (2014).

Jiachuan Pan and Dacheng Ren. “Structural effects on persister control by brominated furanones”. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters. 23: 6559-6562 (2013).

Jiachuan Pan, Xin Xie, Wang Tian, Ali Adem Bahar, Nan Lin, Fangchao Song, Jing An and Dacheng Ren. “(Z)-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene)-3-methylfuran-2(5H)-one sensitizes Escherichia coli persister cells to antibiotics”. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology. 97: 9145-9154 (2013).

Huan Gu, Shuyu Hou, Chanokpon Yongyat, Suzanne De Tore and Dacheng Ren. “Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms”. Langmuir. 29: 11145-11153 (2013).

Jiachuan Pan, Fangchao Song, and Dacheng Ren. “Controlling persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PDO300 by (Z)-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene)-3-methylfuran-2(5H)-one”. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters. 23:4648-4651 (2013).

Jiachuan Pan, Ali Adem Bahar, Haseeba Syed, and Dacheng Ren. “Reverting antibiotic tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 persister cells by (Z)-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene)-3-methylfuran-2(5H)-one”. PLoS ONE. 2012, 7(9): e45778. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0045778.

Tagbo H. R. Niepa, Jeremy L. Gilbert and Dacheng Ren. “Controlling Pseudomonas aeruginosa persister cells by weak electrochemical currents and synergistic effects with tobramycin”. Biomaterials. 2012, 33: 7356–7365.

Robert Szkotak, Tagbo H R Niepa, Nikhil Jawrani, Jeremy L Gilbert, Marcus B Jones and Dacheng Ren. “Differential Gene Expression to Investigate the Effects of Low-level Electrochemical Currents on Bacillus subtilis”. AMB Express. 2011, 1:39.

Xi Chen, Mi Zhang, Chunhui Zhou, Neville R. Kallenbach and Dacheng Ren, “Control of bacterial persister cells by Trp/Arg antimicrobial peptides”. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2011, 77(14): 4878-4885.

Shuyu Hou, Huan Gu, Cassandra Smith and Dacheng Ren, “Microtopographic patterns affect Escherichia coli biofilm formation on polydimethylsiloxane surfaces”. Langmuir. 2011, 27(6): 2686-2691.

Shuyu Hou, Zhigang Liu, Anne Young, Sheron Mark, Neville Kallenbach and Dacheng Ren, “Structural effects on inhibition of planktonic growth and biofilm formation of Escherichia coli by Trp/Arg containing antimicrobial peptides.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2010,76(6): 1967-1974.

Jiachuan Pan and Dacheng Ren, “Quorum sensing inhibitors: a patent overview”. Expert Opinion On Therapeutic Patents (Invited Review). 2009, 19(11):1581-1601.

Miao Duo, Mi Zhang, Yan-Yeung Luk and Dacheng Ren, “Inhibition of Candida albicans Growth by Brominated Furanones”. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology. 2009, 84(6):1551-1563.

Shuyu Hou, Erik A. Button, Ricky Lei Wu, Yan-Yeung Luk and Dacheng Ren, “Prolonged Control of Patterned Biofilm Formation by Bio-inert Surface Chemistry”. Chemical Communication. 2009: 1207-1209.

Shikha Nangia

Degrees:

  • Ph. D. Chemistry (2006) University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • M.Sc. Chemistry (2000) Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India
  • B.Sc. Chemistry (1998) University of Delhi, Delhi, India

Lab/Center Affiliation:

  • Syracuse Biomaterials Institute

Research interests:

  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Targeted cancer drug delivery
  • Multiscale modeling of nanomaterials
  • Nanomedicine
  • Virus nanotechnology

Current Research:

My research group focuses on studying blood-brain barrier using theoretical and computational techniques. The goal is to enable the transport of drug molecules across the blood-brain barrier, which has been the biggest impediment for finding a cure for brain related ailments such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This project was funded through the NSF-CAREER award.

Additionally, we our group focuses on computational multiscale modeling of nanomaterials, including nanomedicine, drug delivery nanocarriers, and nano-bio interactions. The goal of this research is to design efficient nanosized drug delivery carriers to target cancer tumor cells that hold the key to a new era of cancer treatment. To achieve our research goals we are developing quantitative approaches for characterizing interaction of nanoscale entities with living matter (serum, cell-membranes, cells). Our computational approaches are directed to analyze these complex nano-bio interactions in an effort to design safe and smart drug delivery nanocarriers.

Courses Taught:

  • Statistical thermodynamics
  • Multiscale computational methods
  • Reaction kinetics
  • Engineering Materials, Properties, and Processing

Honors:

  • 2017 Dean’s Award for Excellence in Education
  • 2017 Meredith Teaching Recognition Award
  • 2016 College Technology Educator of the Year, Technical Alliance of Central New York
  • 2016 ACS OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award
  • 2015 Nappi Research Competition Award
  • NSF CAREER award (2015)
  • Faculty Excellence Award, College of Engineering and Computer Science, Syracuse University (2015)

Recent Publications:

Development of effective stochastic potential method using random matrix theory for efficient conformational sampling of semiconductor nanoparticles at non-zero temperatures, J. Scher, M. Bayne, A. Srihari, S. Nangia, and A. Chakraborty, Journal of Chemical Physics, 149, 014103 (2018). https://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.5026027
Self-assembly simulations of classic claudins-insights into the pore structure, selectivity and higher-order complexes, F. J. Irudayanathan, X. Wang, N. Wang, S. Willsey, I. Seddon, and S. Nangia, Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 122, 7463-7474 (2018). https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jpcb.8b03842

Mechanism of Antibacterial Activity of Choline-Based Ionic Liquids (CAGE), Kelly N. Ibsen, H. Ma, A. Banerjee, E. E. L. Tanner, S. Nangia, and S. Mitragotri, ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering, 4, 2370-2379 (2018). https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.8b00486

Dynamics of OmpF trimer formation in the bacterial outer membrane of Escherichia coli, H. Ma, A. Khan, and S. Nangia, Langmuir, 34, 5623-5634 (2018). https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.langmuir.7b02653

Architecture of the paracellular channels formed by Claudins of the blood-brain barrier tight junctions, F. J. Irudayanathan, N. Wang, X. Wang , and S. Nangia, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1749-6632 (2017). https://nyaspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/nyas.13378

Modeling diversity in structures of bacterial outer membrane lipids H. Ma, D. D. Cummins, N. B. Edelstein, J. Gomez, A. Khan, M. D. Llewellyn, T. Picudella,  S. R. Willsey and S. Nangia, Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, 13, 811–824 (2017). http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jctc.6b00856

Drug-specific design of telodendrimer architecture for effective Doxorubicin encapsulation, W. Jiang, X. Wang, D. Guo, J. Luo, and S. Nangia, Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 120, 9766–9777 (2016).  http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcb.6b06070

Zhen Ma

Education:

  • Postdoc, University of California, Berkeley
  • Ph.D. Clemson University
  • M.S. Tianjin University
  • B.S. Tianjin University

Areas of Expertise::

  • Stem Cell Engineering Developmental
  • Cardiac tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
  • 3D Organoid Technology

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) allows the recapitulation of human disease models in vitro, which can be used to both study disease mechanisms and ultimately design and screen personalized therapeutics prior to large animal or clinical trials. My research focuses on developing multi-scale cardiac models through the combination of stem cell biology, micro/nanotechnology and cardiovascular research. These in vitro models help us not only understand a variety of fundamental questions on cardiac physiology and development, but also improve the diagnosis and treatment for human heart diseases.

Honors and Awards:

  • Rising Stars Award of BMES Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering
  • National Science Foundation CAREER Award
  • Lush Prize Young Researcher at Americas, Lush Cosmetics

Selected Publications:

  • Kowalczewski A., Sakolish C.M., Hoang P., Liu X., Jacquir S., Rusyn I., Ma Z. (2022) “Integrating nonlinear analysis and machine learning for human induced pluripotent stem cell-based drug cardiotoxicity testing” Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine 16(8): 732-743.
  • Shi H., Wu X., Sun S., Wang C., Ash-Shakoor A., Mather P.T., Henderson J.H., Ma Z. (2022) “Profiling the responsiveness of focal adhesions of human cardiomyocytes to extracellular dynamic nano-topography” Bioactive Materials 10: 367-77.
  • Hoang P., Kowalczewski A., Sun S., Winston T.S., Archilla A., Lemus S., Ercan-Sencicek A.G., Gupta A.R., Liu W., Kontaridis M.I., Amack J., Ma Z. (2021) “Engineering spatial-organized cardiac organoids for developmental toxicity testing” Stem Cell Reports 16(5): 1228-1244.
  • Ma Z., Huebsch H., Koo S., Mandegar M.A., Siemons B., Conklin B.R., Grigoropoulos C.P., Healy K.E. (2018) “Contractile deficits in engineered cardiac microtissues as a result of MYBPC3 deficiency and mechanical overload” Nature Biomedical Engineering 2(12): 955–67.

Era Jain

Experience:

  • Research Scientist, Washington University in Saint Louis
  • Postdoctoral Fellow and Instructor, Saint Louis University
  • Postdoctoral Associate, Virginia Tech

Degrees:

  • Ph.D., Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India, 2011
  • Bachelor’s in Pharmacy, India, 2004

Lab/Center Affiliation:

  • Syracuse BioInspired Institute

Areas of Expertise:

  • Targeted and programed drug delivery for macrophages
  • Injectable and biodegradable hydrogels and scaffolds
  • Musculoskeletal tissue engineering
  • Drug Delivery

Inflammation is a primary component of all diseases including several musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis. The Jain Lab research focuses on engineering immunomodulatory biomaterials for advancing treatment of musculoskeletal disorders and related inflammatory disorders. We are particularly interested in design of macrophage targeting and programed drug delivery systems for spatially and temporally controlled biomolecule release to regulate inflammation. We employ a combination of in vitro models and pre-clinical animal models to evaluate the translational potential of these novel delivery systems.

Honors and Awards

  • 2021 Discovery Award (DoD)
  • 2018 Travel Award for Best Poster, Musculoskeletal Research Center, Winter Symposium, Washington University in Saint Louis 
  • 2017 Best Undergraduate Poster Award to a mentee at STLAURUS 2017
  • 2004-2010 Graduate Research Scholarship, Department of Biotechnology (DBT), India
  • 2008 Travel grant for attending from Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), India.

Selected Publications:

  • I.M. Berke, E. Jain, B.Yavuz, T. McGrath, L. Jing, M. Silva, G. Mbalaviele, F. Guilak, D. Kaplan, L.A. Setton. NF-κB-mediated effects on behavior and cartilage pathology in a non-invasive loading model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis, Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2021), 29, 248-256.
  • E. Jain, S. Neal, H.Graf, X. Tan, R. Balasubramaniam, and N.Huebsch Copper-Free Azide–Alkyne Cycloaddition for Peptide Modification of Alginate Hydrogels ACS Applied Bio Materials (2021) 4 (2), 1229-1237.
  • X, Tan, E. Jain, M.N. Barcellona, E. Morris, S. Neal, M.C. Gupta, J.M. Buchowski, M. Kelly, L.A. Setton, N. Huebsch: Integrin and syndecan peptide-conjugated alginate hydrogel for modulation of nucleus pulposus cell phenotype. Biomaterials. 2021.
  • E. Jain, N.Chinzei, A. Blanco, N. Case, L. J. Sandell, S. Sell, M. F.Rai, S. P. Zustiak, Sustained release of platelet-rich plasma from polyethylene glycol hydrogels exerts beneficial effects on chondrocytes, J. Orthop. res. (https://doi.org/10.1002/jor.24404)
  • E. Jain, A.S. Qayyum, G. Kolar, Y. Kim, S.A. Sell, S.P. Zustiak, Design of electrohydrodynamic sprayed polyethylene glycol hydrogel microspheres for cell encapsulation, Biofabrication 9 (2017) 025019.
  • E. Jain, S. Sheth, A. Dunn, S.P. Zustiak, S.A. Sell, Sustained release of multicomponent platelet-rich plasma proteins from hydrolytically degradable PEG hydrogels, J Biomed Mater Res A 105 (2017) 3304-3314.
  • E. Jain, L. Hill, E. Canning, S.A. Sell, S.P. Zustiak, Control of gelation, degradation and physical properties of polyethylene glycol hydrogels through the chemical and physical identity of the crosslinker, J Mater Chem B 5 (2017) 2679-2691.
  • S.G. Priya, A. Gupta, E. Jain, J. Sarkar, A. Damania, P.R. Jagdale, B.P. Chaudhari, K.C. Gupta, A. Kumar, Bilayer Cryogel Wound Dressing and Skin Regeneration Grafts for the Treatment of Acute Skin Wounds, ACS Appl Mater Inter 8 (2016) 15145-15159.

Ian D. Hosein

Degree(s):

  • B. A. Sc., Engineering Science, University of Toronto, 2004
  • Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, 2009

Areas of Expertise:

  • Energy Conversion and Storage
  • Advanced Composites
  • Functional Surfaces
  • Optical Materials and Devices
  • Bioinspired Materials

Professor Hosein combines materials processing techniques with smart polymer chemistry and novel inorganic chemistry to create materials with tailored structure, composition and advanced optical, electronic, and chemical functionality. His work spans the spectrum from fundamental formation mechanisms to materials fabrication to application-driven research and development.  Current applications target solar energy conversion, electro-chemical energy storage, chemical separation, and smart coatings. 

Honors and Awards:

  • NSF Career Award, 2018
  • 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award, 2019
  • The Association for UV & EB Technology, Innovation Award, 2020

Selected Publications:

James H. Henderson

Degree(s):

  • 2004 Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering Stanford University
  • 2001 M.S. Mechanical Engineering Stanford University
  • 1999 B.S. Mechanical Engineering Rice University, Summa Cum Laude

Lab/Center Affiliation(s):

  • BioInspired Institute

Areas of Expertise:

  • Cell biomechanics and mechanobiology, cell and molecular biology, mechanics, imaging, and computational tools.
  • Functional shape-memory materials to enable innovative strategies to study and control mechanobiological and biomechanical aspects of cell and tissue function and repair.
  • Long-timescale, accurate, and efficient tracking and computational analysis of cells and subcellular structures in complex in vitro environments.

James (Jay) Henderson, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering and the Associate Director of BioInspired Syracuse: The Institute for Material and Living Systems at Syracuse University. His training in Mechanical Engineering was performed at Rice University (BS) and at Stanford University (MS, PhD), where he was a dual Hertz Foundation/Burt and Deedee McMurtry Stanford Graduate Fellow. He performed postdoctoral training in the departments of Biology and Orthopaedics at Case Western Reserve University as an Arthritis Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow. At Syracuse University, the Henderson lab focuses on the study and application of mechanobiology with an emphasis on the development of enabling cytocompatibility and biocompatible shape-memory polymer platforms. Dr. Henderson is a faculty member of the Syracuse Biomaterials Innovation Facility and of the SUNY Upstate Medical University Cancer Research Institute and holds an adjunct position in the Syracuse University department of Biology.

Honors and Awards:

  • 2017 Excellence in Graduate Education Faculty Excellence Award, Syracuse University
  • 2016  James K. Duah-Agyeman Faculty Award, Center for Graduate Preparation and Achievement, Syracuse University
  • 2012 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award
  • 2010 College of Engineering and Computer Science Faculty Excellence Award
  • 2007 New Investigator Recognition Award (NIRA), 6th Combined Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Societies
  • 2006–2008 Arthritis Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow
  • 2005 Aspiring Investigator Award, 5th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Tissue Engineering Consortium

Selected Publications:

Chen J, Hamilton, LE, Mather PT, and Henderson JH. Cell-responsive shape memory polymers. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. In press. Selected to be featured as an ACS Editors’ Choice. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.2c00405

Pieri KG, Felix BM, Zhang T, Soman P, and Henderson JH. Printing parameters affect key properties of 4D printed shape memory polymers. 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing. http://doi.org/10.1089/3dp.2021.0072 In press.

Narkar AR, Tong Z, Soman P (co-corresponding author), and Henderson JH. Smart biomaterial platforms: controlling and being controlled by cells. Biomaterials, 283: 121450, 2022. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2022.121450

Brasch ME, Passucci G, Guldavy A, Turner CE, Manning ML, and Henderson JH. Nuclear position relative to the Golgi body and nuclear orientation are differentially responsive indicators of cell polarized motility. PLoS One, 14 (2), e0211408, 2019. Selected by the editors to be highlighted on the journal homepage. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0211408

Buffington SL, Ali MM, Paul JE, Macios MM, Mather PT, and Henderson JH. Enzymatically triggered shape memory polymers. Acta Biomaterialia, 84, 88–97, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2018.11.031

Wang J, Quach A, Brasch ME, Turner CE, and Henderson JH. On-command on/off switching of progenitor cell and cancer cell polarized motility and aligned morphology via a cytocompatible shape memory polymer scaffold. Biomaterials, 140, 150-61, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2017.06.016

Tseng L, Wang J, Baker RM, Wang G, Mather PT, and Henderson JH. Osteogenic capacity of human adipose-derived stem cells is preserved following triggering of shape memory scaffolds. Tissue Engineering Part A. August, 22(15-16), 1026-1035, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1089/ten.tea.2016.0095

Baker RM, Tseng L, Iannolo MT, Oest ME, and Henderson JH. Self-deploying shape memory polymer scaffolds for grafting and stabilizing complex bone defects: A mouse femoral segmental defect study. Biomaterials, 76, 388-98, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.10.064

Baker RM, Brasch ME, Manning ML, and Henderson JH. Automated, contour-based tracking and analysis of cell behaviour over long timescales in environments of varying complexity and cell density. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 11(97), 20140386, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2014.0386 Program download at: http://henderson.syr.edu/downloads/

Tseng L, Mather PT, and Henderson JH. Shape-memory actuated change in scaffold fiber alignment directs stem cell morphology. Acta Biomaterialia, 9, 8790-8801, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2013.06.043

Davis KA, Burke KA, Mather PT, and Henderson JH. Dynamic cell behavior on shape memory polymer substrates. Biomaterials, 32, 2285–2293, 2011. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.Biomaterials.2010.12.006

Viktor J. Cybulskis

Education

  • Postdoctoral, Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 2016-2018
  • Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, 2016
  • B.S., Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, 2005

Areas of Expertise:

  • Heterogeneous Catalysis
  • Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms
  • Synthetic Materials Chemistry
  • Zeolites and Molecular Sieves

The Cybulskis lab focuses on understanding the molecular details of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions and designing reactive micro-environments to enable pathways for selective chemical transformations that safeguard our ecosystem from harmful emissions and pollutants. We are primarily interested in zeolites and molecular sieves. The well-defined, molecular-sized pores and cavities in these structures can be tailored with distinct catalytic sites and confining voids, allowing them to function as tunable nanoreactors.

Our experimental research approach combines materials synthesis, catalyst characterization, fundamental reaction kinetics, and mechanistic studies to fundamentally understand how the physicochemical properties of porous inorganic solids govern their intrinsic catalytic performance for applications in chemical manufacturing and emissions control. Current research topics include:

  • Carbon-carbon coupling of oxygenated molecules by cooperative acid-base sites in zeolites
  • Tandem catalytic pathways for direct epoxidation of alkenes
  • Methane abatement through low-temperature catalytic oxidation

Selected Publications

Roslova, M.; Cybulskis, V.J.; Davis, M.E.; Zones, S.I.; Zou, X.; Xie, D. “Structure Elucidation and Computationally Guided Synthesis of SSZ-43: A One-Dimensional 12-Membered Ring Zeolite with Unique Sinusoidal Channels.” Angewandte Chemie International Edition2022, DOI: 10.1002/anie.202115087.

Zhu, R.; Liu, B.; Wang, S.; Huang, X.; Schuarca, R.L.; He, W.; Cybulskis, V.J.; Bond, J.Q. “Understanding the Mechanism(s) of Ketone Oxidation on VOx/γ-Al­23.” Journal of Catalysis2021, 404, 109-127.

Guo, Q.; Ren, L.; Kumar, P.; Cybulskis, V.J.; Mkhoyan, A.K.; Davis, M.E.; Tsapatsis, M.; “A Chromium Hydroxide/MIL-101(Cr) Composite Catalyst and its use for Selective Glucose Isomerization to Fructose.” Angewandte Chemie International Edition. 2018, 130, 5020-5024.

Cybulskis, V.J.; Bukowski, B.C.; Tseng, H.-T.; Gallagher, J.R.; Wu, Z.; Wegener, E.; Kropf, A.J.; Ravel, B.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Greeley, J.; Miller, J.T. “Zinc Promotion of Platinum for Catalytic Light Alkane Dehydrogenation: Insights into Geometric and Electronic Effects.” ACS Catalysis. 2017, 7(6), 4173-4181.

Cybulskis, V.J.; Pradhan, S.U.; Lovón-Quintana, J.J.; Hock, A.S.; Hu, B.; Zhang, G.; Delgass, W.N.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Miller, J.T. “The Nature of the Isolated Gallium Active Center for Propane Dehydrogenation on Ga/SiO­2.” Catalysis Letters. 2017, 147, 1252-1262.

Cybulskis, V.J.; Wang, J.; Pazmiño, J.H.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, W.N. “Isotopic Transient Studies of Sodium Promotion of Pt/Al2O3 for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction.” Journal of Catalysis. 2016, 339, 163-172.

Ruth Chen

Degree(s):

  • MPH, Ph.D.

Lab/Center Affiliation(s):

  • Building Energy and Environmental Systems Laboratory

Research Interests:

  • Risk Assessment
  • Environmental Regulation
  • Injurious Effect of Environmental Chemicals
  • Aerosol Delivery of Chemo-preventive Agents
  • Alternative Energy
  • Environmental Education
  • Metabolism of Hepatotoxic Aliphatic Halogenated Hydrocarbons

Current Research:

I am in consultation and exploration with Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering faculty members to form collaboration efforts.

Honors:

  • NIH Grant in Aerosol Delivery of Chemopreventive Agents in the Treatment of Lung Cancer (2011)
  • Center for Disease Control and Prevention Bio-monitoring Grant (2002)
  • USEPA Pesticide Exposure Outreach Grant (2002)
  • NIH Staff Fellowship (1984-87)

Courses Taught:

  • Environmental Risk assessment methodology
  • Environmental toxicology
  • Alternative energy
  • Human health impact of exposures to environmental toxins
  • Education in global response to energy and environmental challenges

Selected Publications:

Jingjie. Zhang, Huijing Fu,, Jing Pan, Yian Wang, Ruth Chen, Da-Ren Chen, and Ming You (2013). Aerosolized Iressa Decreases Lung Tumorigenesis with Minimal Adverse Systemic Effect, to be submitted to Lung Cancer Research.

Jingjie Zhang, Huijing Fu, Jing Pan, Ruth Chen, Yian Wang, Da-Ren Chen, and Ming You (2013). Chemoprevention of Lung Carcinogenesis by the Combination of Aerosolized Budesonide and Oral Polyphenon E in A/J Mice, to be submitted to Molecular Carcinogenesis.

Madelyn Ball, Ruth Chen, and Yinjie J Tang (2012). The “Some Sense” of Biofuels. J. Petroleum.Environmental Biotechnology, 3:4.

Qi Zhang, Jing Pan, Jingjie Zhang, Pengyuan Liu, Yian Wang, Ruth Chen, Da-Ren Chen, Ronald Lubet, and Ming You (2011). Aerosolized Targretin Decreases Lung Tumorigenesis Without Increasing Triglyceride and Cholesterol Level in Serum, Lung Cancer Prevention, 4(2):270-276.

Huijing Fu, Jingjie Zhang, Jing Pan, Qi Zhang, Yan Lu, Weidong Wen, Ronald A. Lubet, Eva Szabo, Ruth Chen, Yian Wang, Da-Ren Chen, and Ming You (2011), Chemoprevention of Lung Carcinogenesis by the Combination of Aerosolized Budesonide and Oral Pioglitazone in A/J Mice, Molecular Carcinogenesis, 50(12):913-921.

H. Fu, J. He, F. Mei, Q. Zhang, Y. Hara, S. Ryota, R. A. Lubet, R. Chen, Da-Ren Chen, and M. You (2009). Anti-lung Cancer Effect of Epigallocatechin-3-gallate is Dependent on Its Presence in a Complex Mixture (Polyphenon E), Cancer Prevention Research, 2(6):531-537. (Cover page article)

Mary Beth Browning Monroe

Lab/Center Affiliation:

BioInspired Institute

Research interests:

  • Biomaterials
  • Polymers
  • Shape Memory Polymers
  • Wound Healing
  • Tissue Engineering

The Monroe Biomaterials Lab utilizes basic and application-focused research to fabricate and characterize polymeric biomaterials with improved healing outcomes. Our long-term research vision is to make fundamental advances in polymer chemistry that enable safer and more effective medical devices. Current research projects include (1) the development of hemostatic foams to control bleeding in gunshot wounds; (2) synthesis and characterization of hydrogels for chronic wound healing, Crohn’s fistula closure, and cell delivery; and (3) ‘smart’ materials to improve infection surveillance, prevention, and treatment.

Honors and Awards:

  • NIH National Research Service Award Post-doctoral Fellowship (2015)
  • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (2010-13)
  • P.E.O. Scholar Award, Endowed Scholar: Presidential Scholar Award (2012-13)
  • Acta Biomaterialia Student Award (2012)
  • Outstanding Engineering Graduate Student Award, Dwight Look College of Engineering, Texas A&M University (2012)

Selected Publications:

  • H.T. Beaman, B. Howes, P.S. Ganesh, M.B.B. Monroe, “Shape Memory Polymer Hydrogels with Cell-Responsive Degradation Mechanisms for Crohn’s Fistula Closure,” Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Part A. 1-12 (2022). DOI: 10.1002/jbm.a.37376. Featured in Society for Biomaterials 2022 Awards Issue.
  • M. Ramezani, M.B.B. Monroe, “Biostable segmented thermoplastic polyurethane shape memory polymers for smart biomedical applications,” ACS Applied Polymer Materials, 4 (3) 1956–1965 (2022). DOI: 10.1021/acsapm.1c01808
  • C. Du, J. Liu, D.A. Fikhman, K.S. Dong, M.B.B. Monroe, “Shape Memory Polymer Foams with Phenolic Acid-Based Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties for Traumatic Wound Healing,” Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology. 10, 8093961 (2022). DOI: 10.3389/fbioe.2022.809361
  • H.T. BeamanE. Shepherd, J. Satalin, S. Blair, H. Ramcharran, K. DongD. Fikhman, G. Nieman, S.G. Schauer, M.B.B. Monroe, “Hemostatic Shape Memory Polymer Foams With Improved Survival in a Lethal Traumatic Hemorrhage Model,” Acta Biomaterialia. 137, 112-123 (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.actbio.2021.10.005

Katie Cadwell

Education:

  • B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science & Technology (formerly University of Missouri-Rolla)
  • Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering, Thesis Advisor: Nicholas L. Abbott, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Post-doctoral Research Associate in STEM Education and Outreach, Interdisciplinary Education Group, Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Chemistry Instructor, General Chemistry Coordinator, and Engineering Transfer Program Director, Madison Area Technical College

Lab/ Center/ Institute affiliation:

BioInspired Institute

Areas of Expertise:

  • Chemical Engineering Education
  • Faculty and Student Professional Development
  • Best Practices in Engineering Education

Honors and Awards:

  • AIChE Student Chapter Advisor Honor Roll, 2015-2021
  • 2015 Teaching Recognition Award from the Syracuse University Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professorship Program
  • 2015 Syracuse University Chancellor’s Awards for Public Engagement and Scholarship: Inspiration Award
  • 2014 Syracuse University College of Engineering and Computer Science Dean’s Award for Excellence in Engineering Education
  • 2014 Technology Alliance of Central New York (TACNY) College Technology Educator of the Year

Selected Publications:

  • Blum, M.M., Cadwell, K.D., Hasenwinkel, J.M., “A Model for a Faculty Development Course Redesign Summer Working Group.” Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education 2020 Virtual Annual Conference and Exposition, 2020.
  • Cadwell, K.D., Blum M. M., Hasenwinkel, J.M., Stokes-Cawley, C. “A Gateway Course Redesign Working Group.” Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education 2018 Annual Conference and Exposition, Salt Lake City, UT, 2018.
  • Stokes-Cawley, C. and Cadwell, K.D. “Project ENGAGE: A Summer Immersion Experience in Engineering for Middle School Girls.” Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education St. Lawrence Section Regional Conference, Syracuse, NY, 2015. Reprinted in Transactions on Techniques in STEM Education, 2016, 1(2): 20-29.
  • Blum, M.M, Cadwell, K.D., Hasenwinkel, J.M. “A mechanics of materials outreach activity: Reconstructing the human body – biomaterials and biomimicry.” Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education 2015 Annual Conference and Exposition, Seattle, WA, 2015.
  • Walz, K.A., Britton, S., Crain, J., Cadwell, K., Hoffman, A., Morschauser, P. “Biodiesel synthesis, viscosity, and quality control for an introductory chemistry lab.” The Chemical Educator, 2014, 19: 342-346.
  • Hoffman, A., Britton, S., Cadwell, K.D., Walz, K.A. “An integrated approach to introducing biofuels, flash point, and vapor pressure concepts into an introductory college chemistry lab.” Journal of Chemical Education, 2011, 88(2): 197-200.

Jesse Q. Bond

Degree(s):

  • B.S., Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, 2002
  • Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2009

Research Interests:

  • Heterogeneous catalysis
  • Bio-based fuels and chemicals
  • Energy sustainability

Current Research:

Our group is focused on the design and application of catalytic materials for improving sustainability in the production of transportation fuels and chemical products. In our research, we leverage heterogeneous catalysis to facilitate the conversion of renewable feedstocks to drop-in replacements for traditional, petroleum-derived fuels. We approach this task mindful of the guiding principles of environmental stewardship and thus promote total biomass utilization, energy efficiency and conservation, and waste minimization as we strive to advance the state of the art in renewable energy.

Teaching Interests:

  • CEN 600: Heterogeneous catalysis
  • CEN 600: Biofuels
  • CEN 587: Chemical Reaction Engineering

Select Publications:

Wettstein, S.G., Bond, J.Q., Martin Alonso, D., Pham, H.N., Datye, A.K., Dumesic, J.A., “RuSn bimetallic catalysts for selective hydrogenation of levulinic acid to γ-valerolactone.” Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, 2012, 117–118. 321 – 329.

Martin Alonso, D., Wettstein, S.G., Bond. J.Q., Root, T.W., and Dumesic, J.A. “Production of Biofuels from Cellulose and Corn Stover using Alkylphenol Solvents,” ChemSusChem, 2011, 4, 8, 1078–1081.

Bond, J.Q., Wang, D., Martin Alonso, D., and Dumesic, J.A. “Interconversion Between g-valerolactone and Pentenoic Acid Combined with Decarboxylation to Form Butene Over Silica/Alumina.” Journal of Catalysis, 281, 2, 25, 2011, 290-299.

Martin Alonso, D., Bond, J.Q., Wang, D., and Dumesic, J.A., “Activation of Amberlyst-70 for Alkene Oligomerization in Hydrophobic Media.” Topics in Catalysis, 2011, 54, 5-7, 447 -457.

Bond, J.Q., Martin Alonso, D., West, R.M., Dumesic, J.A. “g-Valerolactone Ring-Opening and Decarboxylation over SiO2/Al¬2O3 in the Presence of Water.”Langmuir, 2010, 26, 21, 16291 – 16298.

Martin Alonso, D., Bond, J.Q., Dumesic, J.A. “Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels.”Green Chemistry, 2010, 12, 1493-1513.

Bond, J.Q., Martin Alonso, D., Wang, D., West, R.M., Dumesic, J.A. “Integrated Catalytic Conversion of g-Valerolactone to Liquid Alkenes for Transportation Fuels.” Science, 2010, 327, 5969, 1110-1114.

Industrial Assessment Center

The Syracuse Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) is one of 24 centers across the country supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. All IAC locations are housed at a college or university and managed by faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduates in ABET accredited engineering and computer science schools.

The Syracuse IAC was established in 2001 and is committed to assisting manufacturing facilities in New York State, generating recommended savings based on energy reduction, waste stream minimization, productivity optimization and overall efficiency increases.

We have experienced and have performed over 310 audits since the center’s founding. Our assessments have saved companies an average of $66,000 annually and our implementation rate is approximately 48%. Our assessments include a comprehensive technical report that addresses a wide breadth of recommendations tailored to fit each of our client’s specific needs.

Syracuse Center of Excellence (CoE) in Environmental Energy Systems

SyracuseCoE is a collaborative organization that accelerates development of innovations for a sustainable future. As New York State’s Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems, we engage more than 200 private companies, organizations, and academic institutions to create new products and services in indoor environmental quality, clean and renewable energy, and water resource management.

With a staff based at its headquarters in downtown Syracuse, SyracuseCoE has three specialized teams that focus on research, industry collaboration, and sustainable community solutions. In research, we are at the forefront of groundbreaking new clean technologies—leveraging world-class R&D facilities from the iconic, high-performance, LEED™ Platinum “living laboratory” that is the SyracuseCoE headquarters to the state-of-the-art labs of our academic and industry partners. We drive and accelerate innovative research to the marketplace through strategic industry collaborations regionally, nationally, and internationally. We create sustainable community solutions by implementing new technologies and bringing the latest knowledge on environmental sustainability to the public through educational and training programs.

At our Syracuse site, we provide laboratory and office space for research and business collaborations involving new environmental and energy systems products and services. Research areas include systems that monitor and control comfortable air temperature, air quality, lighting, sound and water quality in built and urban environments, and innovative energy systems, including clean technologies and renewable fuel sources.

The work of the SyracuseCoE and its members impacts the essentials of our human existence in harmony with nature. We improve the energy that powers our lives, the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the buildings in which we live, work, learn, and play.

Faculty

Center for Advanced Systems and Engineering (CASE)

CASE is New York State’s premier applied research center for interdisciplinary expertise in complex information intensive systems, including monitoring and control, predictive analysis, intelligence, security and assurance.
CASE has been a designated New York State Center of Advanced Technology (CAT) since 1984, bringing together traditional academic strengths in research and education to promote strong university-industry interaction and generate positive economic impact across New York State and beyond.

Faculty

Julie M. Hasenwinkel

Degree(s):

  • PhD, Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University
  • MS, Bioengineering, Clemson University
  • BSE, Biomedical Engineering, Duke University

Lab/Center Affiliation(s):

  • BioInspired Institute

Areas of Expertise:

  • Faculty development in teaching and learning
  • Engineering education and active learning pedagogies
  • Student success initiatives
  • Orthopedic Biomaterials
  • Biomaterials for Nerve Regeneration

My research originally focused on translational polymeric biomaterials for orthopedics and nerve regeneration applications.  We worked on the design, synthesis, characterization, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of acrylic bone cements, nanoparticle drug delivery systems to treat spinal cord injury, and micropatterned and mechanically-active hydrogels.  We also developed new techniques for studying spinal cord injury in vivo and in vitro.  Since 2012, my research program has gradually transitioned to a focus on engineering education, faculty development, and student success.  I have studied the impact of faculty-student interactions and peer interactions on student persistence towards a bachelor’s degree in Engineering and Computer Science.  Specifically, I investigate the link between faculty development in innovative pedagogy and advising practices, with implementation in Engineering and Computer Science courses and academic advising, and subsequent effects on student attitudes towards persistence and retention rates. I have also developed several cohort-based scholarship programs to support student success.

Honors and Awards:

  • Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence 2022
  • Faculty Excellence Award, College of Engineering and Computer Science 2013
  • Executive Leadership in Academic Technology and Engineering (ELATE) Fellow 2013-2014
  • Wallace H. Coulter Foundation Early Career Translational Research Award, Phases I & II 2007-11
  • Judith Greenberg Seinfeld Distinguished Faculty Fellow, Syracuse University 2006-07
  • Teaching Recognition Award, Syracuse University 2004
  • James D. Watson Investigator Award, New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research (NYSTAR) 2003

Select Publications:

  • A.Y. Au, J.M. Hasenwinkel, and C.G. Frondoza, “Hepatocytes cultured on collagen modified micropatterned agarose for evaluating inflammatory and oxidative stress responses,” Applied In Vitro Toxicity, 7(1): 4-13, 2021.  https://doi.org/10.1089/aivt.2020.0015
  • P. Kunwar, A. Jannini, Z. Xiong, M.J. Ransbottom, J.S. Perkins, J.H. Henderson, J.M. Hasenwinkel, and P. Soman, “High-resolution 3D printing of stretchable hydrogel strutures using optical projection lithography,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 12(1):1640-1649, 2020.  https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.9b19431
  • S. Fillioe, K. Bishop, A. Jannini, J. Kim, R. McDonough, S. Ortiz, J. Goodisman, J.M. Hasenwinkel, C. Peterson, and J. Chaiken, “In vivo, noncontact, real-time, PF[O]H imaging of the immediate local physiological response to spinal cord injury in a rat model,” Journal of Biomedical Optics, 25(3), 2019. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.25.3.032007
  • M.J. Wiegand, K. Faraci, B.E. Reed, and J.M. Hasenwinkel, “Enhancing mechanical properties of an injectable two-solution acrylic bone cement using a difunctional crosslinker,” Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Part B: Applied Biomaterials, 107B:783-790, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34172

Chemical Engineering Student Profile: Ran Zhu G’21

Ran Zhu is the co-recipient of the 2021 Outstanding Graduate Student Award in Chemical Engineering.

Hometown: Zhengzhou, Henan, China

CEN/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: Seminars and meetings with future faculty.

Favorite thing about CEN: Best faculty and staff that I’ve ever met.

Favorite thing about SU: Wonderful summer and the amazing big lake effect. (I really enjoyed the snow season!)

Plan after graduation: Postdoctoral fellow at MIT, looking for a position in academia or research-related position in the chemical engineering industry in China.

Chemical Engineering Student Profile: Seth Reed ’21

Seth Reed ’21 is the recipient of the 2021 Engineering and Computer Science Alumni Association Service Award. This award recognizes outstanding service on behalf of the college community

  • Hometown: Rexford, NY
  • CEN/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: Researcher in Prof. Hosein’s lab, Engineering Ambassadors (current Program Coordinator), ECS Dean’s Advisory Panel, Men’s Club Volleyball Team (current Vice President), Orientation Leaders, Keys Player at Abundant Life Christian Center
  • Favorite thing about CEN: My favorite thing about CEN is the research experiences I had in the energy storage field within Dr. Hosein’s lab.
  • Favorite thing about SU: My favorite thing about Syracuse University is that I have been able to explore many opportunities outside of my academics. From being a setter on the club volleyball team to welcoming first-year students at the beginning of each semester, I grew as a person in varying aspects of my life during my last four years here.
  • Plan after graduation: I will pursue a Ph.D. in Materials Science & Engineering at the Texas Materials Institute at UT-Austin.

Nandhini Rajagopal G’21 Receives the 2021 Outstanding Graduate Student Award in Bioengineering

Nandhini Rajagopal is the recipient of the 2021 Outstanding Graduate Student Award in Bioengineering and received national recognition for a breakthrough molecular computational tool.

Hometown: Mumbai, India

BEN/ECS/other activities:

  • WiSE associate(2017-2019)
  • Contributed in training undergraduates in ECS scholar program in summer 2018
  • Student mentor for REU at Nangia lab in 2018.

Favorite thing about BEN: Highly encouraging, supportive and easy-to-approach BEN faculty and staff!

Favorite thing about SU: In my view SU is the perfect place for research, with calm surroundings and friendly people, that nurture creativity and encourage excellence in research.

Plan after graduation: After graduation I will start a postdoctoral fellowship at Boehringer Ingelheim pharmaceuticals for antibody research.

Bioengineering Student Profile: Bailey Felix ’21

Bailey Felix ’21 is the winner of the 2021 Oren Nagasako Award.  This award is given annually to a Bioengineering senior who demonstrates outstanding dedication and hard work acting as a mentor or preceptor to fellow students.

Hometown: Rochester, NY

BEN/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: Undergraduate research in the Henderson Lab, undergraduate design with Dr. Yung, peer leaders, SOURCE Student Research Mentor and Excelerators.

Favorite thing about BEN: Definitely the professors. They all genuinely care about student success and they have been the most incredible support system during my time here.

Favorite thing about SU: The culture at SU is amazing. Between the supportive academic environment and the passion for sports and school pride, I couldn’t imagine a better place to have spent the last 4 years.

Plan after graduation: I will be starting a Ph.D. program in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Maryland this fall.

Chemical Engineering Ph.D. Student Profile: Plansky Hoang

Plansky Hoang is the co-recipient of the 2021 Outstanding Graduate Student Award in Chemical Engineering.

  • Hometown: Syracuse, NY
  • CEN/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: WiSE, BMES
  • Favorite thing about CEN: are the faculty, staff and students I’ve been able to work with throughout my graduate career. Everyone I’ve met has been very supportive of my goals and pushed me to challenge myself in this career path
  • Favorite thing about SU: My favorite thing about SU is that it’s a great school that’s close to home
  • Plan after graduation: My plan after graduation is to work on my postdoc here at SU, and work towards a teaching faculty position

Bioengineering Student Profile: Natalie Petryk ’21

Natalie Petryk ’21 is the recipient of the 2021 Karen M. Hiiemae Outstanding Achievement Award in Bioengineering.

  • Hometown: Berkeley Heights, NJ
  • BEN/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: Alpha Omega Epsilon, Academic Excellence Workshop Facilitator, Engineering World Health, Excelerators, Relay for Life
  • Favorite thing about BEN: The many opportunities to get involved in research and take on independent projects outside of the classroom
  • Favorite thing about SU: All the friends and memories I’ve made while here
  • Plan after graduation: I will be here at SU one more year to complete my master’s thesis in Dr. Monroe’s Biomaterials Lab

This award was established in memory of Dr. Karen M. Hiiemae, beloved professor, mentor, and pioneer in science and research, for a senior who has combined outstanding academic achievement in bioengineering with the strength and spirit Dr. Hiiemae exhibited throughout her life.

Bioengineering Student Profile: Bearett Tarris ’21

Bearett Tarris ’21 is the 2021 recipient of the Bioengineering Founders Award.

  • Hometown: Sewickley, Pennsylvania
  • BEN/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: Engineering World Health, Biomedical Engineering Society, Researcher in Dr. Ma’s Lab in SBI, Two-time SOURCE recipient (summer 2020 with Dr. Ma studying the effect of geometry on the self-assembly of tissue grown from mesenchymal stem cells and academic year 2020-2021 prototyping OttoRotate, an inclusive design for handicap vehicles with my capstone team) student-athlete (track and field), Alpha Phi Omega (service fraternity).
  • Favorite thing about BEN: I love how broad bioengineering is and how the curriculum at Syracuse caters to that. During my undergraduate career, I was able to learn about everything under the bioengineering umbrella from circuitry to human physiology to mechanical design.
  • Favorite thing about SU: I love how much people love it here. The excitement and passion that I saw in the students during my campus tour is what lead me to choose Syracuse.
  • Plan after graduation: I will be continuing my education at Syracuse University pursuing my Master’s in Bioengineering.

This award is in honor of Drs. Joseph Zwislocki and Earl Kletsky, initiators and nurturers of the bioengineering program, and is given to a senior who has demonstrated outstanding and wide-ranging skills

Chemical Engineering Student Spotlight: Connor Wescott ’21

Congratulations to Connor Wescott ’21! He is the 2021 recipient of the Outstanding Achievement Award in Chemical Engineering

  • Hometown: Stillwater, NY
  • CEN/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: Member of AIChE, ChemE Car Co-director, Physics Coach, Intramural Broomball
  • Favorite thing about CEN: The close-knit community we have in the department and how personable all of the staff has been throughout my four years here.
  • Favorite thing about SU: As an avid sports fan I loved being able to attend so many football and basketball games and be a part of the strong school spirit SU has. Go orange!
  • Plan after graduation: To enter the industry and enjoy a lifelong career of working and learning as a chemical engineer.

This award is endowed by I.A. Hotze, BEE ’43, for the senior with the most distinguished academic record

Bioengineering Ph.D. Student Receives National Recognition for Breakthrough Molecular Computational Tool

Nandhini Rajagopal’s accomplishments are massive even though her research focuses on small molecules. As part of biomedical and chemical engineering Professor Shikha Nangia’s research group, the Ph.D. student has focused her work on minute interactions between protein molecules in the biological cells that make up all living things. These interactions between proteins are essential since proteins are the building blocks of all living things.  Rajagopal’s work is entirely computational and as part of her research she developed a new algorithm that could determine how two different protein molecules would interact.

“These small proteins are found in every tissue of our body,” says Rajagopal. “Using computers we literally visualize how these molecules move around each other and aggregate.”

Rajagopal’s computational tool can screen all possible orientations for how two proteins would interact with each other.

“How proteins interact has a direct impact on their functions,” says Rajagopal. “I wanted to create an algorithm that would also plot a graph showing an intuitive, easy-to-interpret three-dimensional energy landscape of the two interacting protein molecules.”

“The algorithm produces not only highly accurate results, it is also highly efficient. Nandhini’s algorithm can sample millions of protein-protein interactions in a matter of minutes, which otherwise used to take weeks to simulate,” says Nangia.

Rajagopal was selected to present her computational method at the 2020 Gordon Research Conference (GRC), a premier scientific conference where a select group of researchers meet to discuss cutting-edge research in biological, chemical and physical sciences. Rajagopal’s presentation was well received by the experts in the field and led to multiple national and international collaborations.

The algorithm was published in the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation and featured on the cover. For her outstanding work, Rajagopal won several notable awards:

  • 2021 Merck Research Award from the American Chemical Society (ACS) Women Chemistry Committee
  • 2020 ACS Chemical Computing Group Excellence Award for Graduate Students
  • 2021 All University Doctoral Prize from the College of Engineering and Computer Science.
  • 2021 Outstanding Graduate Student in Bioengineering
  • 2021 Research Presentation Award, College of Engineering and Computer Science Research Day
  • 2020 Syracuse University Graduate Student Award for Distinguished Biomaterials Research

Rajagopal is finishing up an externship at Genentech’s pharmaceutical development division and will begin a postdoctoral research position at pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim this summer.

She hopes to continue her current research and see how it could expand to cancer studies.

“With the new algorithm, we can decipher how interactions between proteins can be altered and could aid in finding new drugs for diseases whose treatment options were elusive. I am extremely proud of the Nandhini’s innovation,” says Nangia.

Chemical Engineering Student Profile: Spencer Tardy ’21

Chemical engineering student Spencer Tardy is the recipient of the 2021 Louis N. DeMartini Award for Outstanding Design Project. This award recognizes all-around outstanding achievements in scholarship, service and leadership at Syracuse University.

Hometown: East Brunswick, New Jersey

CEN/ECS/other activities you have been involved with: I have been involved with the Engineering Ambassadors and Excelerator programs, am a co-director of the AIChE: ChemE Car program, AEW Facilitator, Tau Beta Pi member, and former president of the SU Bowling Club.

Favorite thing about CEN: My favorite aspect of Chemical Engineering is that it provides a unique viewpoint of the world around me, as well as an ability to have significant impact on that world.

Favorite thing about SU: My favorite thing about SU is the sense of family that is created here. Everyone here knows that no matter what happens, or where they may be, the Orange Nation will always be there to support them.

Plan after graduation: After graduation I plan to pursue a career as a practicing chemical engineer in the food and beverage or pharmaceutical and bio-technology industries.

Engineering and Computer Science 2021 Research Day Award Winners

Thank you to everyone who took part in the Engineering and Computer Science 2021 Research Day on March 12th! We would also like to give a special thanks to Dr. Joseph Helble, Provost of Dartmouth College, for the keynote presentation. Here are the winners as chosen by our panel of judges.

Energy, Environment and Smart Materials

First Prize: Light-Induced Self-Writing: A Novel Approach to Develop Organized Polymer Composite Materials. Shreyas Pathreeker; Advisor Dr. Ian Hossein

Second Prize: Development of Inside Out Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Combined Heat and Power Systems. Alexander Hartwell, Advisor Dr. Jeongmin Ahn

Third Prize: HYDRUS-1D Modeling to Represent Hydrologic Performance of the OnCenter Green Roof. Courtney Gammon; Advisor Dr. Cliff Davidson

Communication and Security

First Prize: Optimized Virtual Antenna Array of Wideband Narrow Beam MIMO System for Overlapped Virtual Elements. Richard Tanski, Advisor: Dr. Jay Lee

Second Prize: Coverage in Networks with Hybrid Terahertz, Millimeter Wave, and Microwave Transmissions. Xueyuan Wang, Advisor: Dr. M. Cenk Gursoy

Third Prize: An Efficient Deep Capsule Network with Interleaved Sparse Connections and Attention-Based Routing. Chenbin Pan, Advisor: Dr. Senem Velipasalar

Sensors, Robotics and Smart Systems

First Prize: Towards Disaster Recovery: Incorporating the Uncertainties Caused by Cyber Attacks in Controlled Islanding. Sagnik Basumallik, Advisor: Dr. Sara Eftekharnejad

Second Prize: Real-Time Adaptive Sensor Attack Detection in Autonomous Cyber-Physical Systems. Francis Akowuah, Advisor: Dr. Fanxin Kong

Third Prize (tie): Data Generation for Transient Stability Assessment to Address Lack of Training Data. Rui Ma, Advisor: Dr. Sara Eftekharnejad AND Soft Crawling Inchworm Robot Enabled by Dynamically Tunable Friction. Siavash Sharifi, Advisor: Dr. Wanliang Shan

Health and Well-being

First Prize: Investigation of the Effects of Electrochemical Reactions on Complex Metal Tribocorrosion within the Human Body. Thomas Welles; Advisor Dr. Jeongmin Ahn

Second Prize: Prediction of Tight Junction Strand Architecture. Nandhini Rajagopal, Advisor Dr. Shikha Nangia

Third Prize: Persister Control by Leveraging Dormancy Associated Reduction of Antibiotic Efflux. Sweta Roy; Advisor Dr. Dacheng Ren

Fall 2020 Engineering and Computer Science Dean’s List

In recognition of superior scholarship, the following students have been entered on the Engineering and Computer Science Dean’s List for Fall 2020.

To be eligible for Dean’s List recognition, the minimum semester grade point average must be 3.40 or higher, must have earned a minimum of 12 graded credits and must have no missing or incomplete grades.

Students: Please email engineering@syr.edu if you have questions about your current Dean’s List status.

Aerospace Engineering

Sean  Adams

Zar Nigar  Ahmad

Mukhammed Shamil  Askarov

Justin Douglas Blowers

Katherine Elizabeth Braun

Madeline Constance Brooks

Richard L Bruschi

Owen P Clyne

Nicholas Daniel Crane

Brian James Cronin

Ryan  Demis

Aleksandar  Dzodic

Kaleb Jonah Eddy

Hans-Christian  Esser

Kassidy  Fields

Christian Scott Fitzgerald

Elan  Fullmer

Benjamin Daniel Gerard

Alexandre J Gill

Sareta Rose Gladson

Jacob D Gomez

Zachary William Haas

David Leo Hadley

Alyssa  Henley

Aidan  Hoff

Jiaji  Hu

Sydney F Jud

Harrison  Kayton

Trevor Anthony Knight

Justin  Kohan

Trevor D Kroells

Isaac Alan Lehigh

Jacob Eric Long

Powers Craig Lynch

Noah  Martel

Maxwell Joseph Martin

Jason W McElhinney

Mariana C McManus

Alexander T Metcalf

John P Michinko

Vincent Anthony Miczek

Kendra Teresa Miller

Maximus Jules Mintz

Paul Robert Mokotoff

Evan Gregory Moore

Brendan Pierce Murty

Mark  Namatsaliuk

Daniel  Oluwalana

Randall McGinnis Osborn

David Dang Pham

Madeline G Phelan

Logan D Prye

Kazi Golam Rafee

Kip  Risch-Andrews

Tracey Josephine Rochette

Jared M Rodriguez

Gregory Joseph Ruef

William J Saueressig

Fred Evan Schaffer

Justine John A Serdoncillo

Vraj  Shah

Prabha  Singh

Gregory C Slodysko Jr

Zachary Michael Stahl

Ethan J Stocum

Marco  Svolinsky

Richard A Tedeschi

Darlene A Tinsley

Anthony R Tricarico

Sasha  Valitutti

Cody Joseph Vannostrand

Mason Alexander Weber

Timothy Dwayne Wiley

Aliza Marie Willsey

Xinyu  Wu

Melissa  Yeung

Bioengineering

Samantha Michelle Abate

Jordyn Danielle Abrams

Bianca Louise Andrada

Gabriela  Angel

Oumou  Azika

Colin J Babick

Paige  Bencivenga

Ailla Frances Bishop

Colby James Black

Anna Mae Brunson

Zeynep Sue Cakmak

Britnie Jean Carpentier

Jade Ashlee Carter

Maria G Catalane

Elizabeth Ann Clarke

Dominic Thomas Clinch

Mya R Cohen

Lukas  Cook

Shane A Corridore

Shaila S Cuellar

Linzy M Dineen

Anthony Mark Dragone

Alejandro J Durand

Bailey M Felix

Akweshie A Fon-Ndikum

Gabriela Renee Gonzalez-Beauchamp

Skyla  Gordon

Nathaniel Fee Gur-Arie

Grace  Haas

Lauren Elizabeth Hamilton

Victoria Li Rui Hathaway

Brenna  Henderson

Avinash  Jagroo

Madeline  Jones

Simran  Karamchandani

Gabriel  Khan

Mohamed F Khan

Olivia Lynne Kmito

Kiana Yanira Lally

Sara Anne Leonardo

Isabelle S Lewis

Trevor Daniel Amnott Liimatainen

Xinyan  Lin

Alejandra Eugenia Lopez

Mark Maximilian Macios

Ethan L Masters

Aelish  McGivney

Caitlin R Mehl

Lindy M Melegari

Hallie Teresa Morgan

Connor G Mulligan

Hannah V Murphy

Jonathan  Ngo

Mark  Nicola

Nicole E Nielsen

Matt Evan Orlando

Megan Isabel Perlman

Natalie Marie Petryk

Connor  Preston

Alexander C Rateb

Beatrice Elizabeth Reilly

Gavin David Richards

Rebecca A Schaefer

Brielle L Seidel

Alyssa  Shelburne

Justin N Stock

Elizabeth Tarami Su

Bearett Ann Tarris

Zhuoqi  Tong

Edgardo  Velazquez

Royce Robert Weber-Pierson

Nathaniel D Wellington

Maximillian Meier Wilderman

Lauren Margaret Woodford

Rui  Xie

Alina  Zdebska

Julian Marcus Smucker Zorn

Samantha  Zysk

Chemical Engineering

Paige O Adebo

Adriana M Archilla

Steven Matthew Axelsen

Olivia Anna Babu

Athena Andrea Basdekis

Sandy Ynhu Cao

Karley M Chambers

Trinity Joy Coates

Olushola  Coker

Kelly  Correa

Hao  Dai

Dennis  Dao

Samantha  Esparza

David Anthony Fikhman

Edward Coleman Fluker

Priya S Ganesh

Brent Tadao Gosselin

Avery  Gunderson

Oduduabasi James Isaiah

Aiden A Jacobs

Stanley  Jimenez

Sayf  Karim

Laxmi  Khatiwada

Adam J Klinger

Simran Dharmendra  Lakhani

Rawia F A M  Marafi

Angela L Martinez

Oliver  Mutu

Fabiana Nohelia Perez

Seth  Reed

Ivan  Sarbinov

Arsh Saifahmed Shaikh

Jacob Matthew Shellhamer

Dakota Alexander Story

Jason  Tan

Spencer T Tardy

Megan  Varcoe

Briana Nicole Vlacich

Connor Andrew Wescott

Nia  Williams

Melita  Zejnilovic

Civil Engineering

Orges  Agolli

Osama  Alkasabra

Anna Rose Arcaro

Nicole  Ayora-Gonzalez

Vincent  Barone

Noah J Bonett

Ryan  Bourdeau

Arielle  Bramble

Matthew Emmet Brewster

David Michael Brodsky

Emma Jane Brown

Alycia Joline Bruce

Joli L Cacciatore

Trevor  Caviness

Alejandro E Correa

Aymeric P Destree

Thomas  Driscoll

Bradley Charles Frederick

Maraea K Garcia

Stephen  Goffredo

Bensen  Gu

Zelin  Guo

Kyle Jacob Huff

Zachary Stephen Jodice

Kate Astrid Kemnitz

Alexander Gregory Klee

Adam Paul Landry

Abigail G Laschalt

Haben  Legesse

Daniel  Leyva

Emma Marie Liptrap

Emilija Alise Lizins

Erick  Lojano-Quispe

Lluvia Margarita Lopez Garces

John M Mazza

Michael J McDonough

Jessica M McGowan

Amira A Mouline

Marissa R Nicole

Erin E O’Brien

Kevin B Ordonez

Benjamin Joseph Putrino

Svetislav  Radovic

Victoria Isabella Rea

Isabella  Salgado

Cassie Elizabeth Saracino

Emma Hayes Schoonover

Juha Wesley Schraden

Ravyn  Smith

Caitlin Jane Spillane

Erin Meagan Splaine

Adrian  Stiefelmann

Anand  Veeraswamy

Nathan  Viramontes

Joseph Peter Wollke

Isabelle  Wong

Paige H Yamane

Computer Engineering

Adekunle J Akinshola

Chikeluba K Anierobi

Malkiel  Asher

Mergim  Azemi

Gavin M Beaudry

Kyle J Betten

Jackson Thomas Bradley

Jinzhi  Cai

Edward Patrick Caraccioli

Dynasty Da’Nasia Chance

Yifei  Che

Dana Marie Castillo Chea

Guoliang  Chen

Kongxin  Chen

Hossain  Delwar

Xavier  Evans

Elizabeth A Fatade

Isaiah Armando Fernandez

Aidan Robert Harrington

Ethan  Hensley

Benjamin N Johnson

Fundi  Juriasi

Ryan Anthony Kane

Andrew Edward Kelsey

Bikash  Khatiwoda

Connor  Kinahan

Jason C Kirk

Nicholas Gerard Lee Landry

Jessica K Lat

Matthew B Leight

Jiaxiong  Li

Cayden T Lombard

Nicholas Kent Magari

Kyle David Maiorana

Mrinal  Mathur

Isabel M Melo

Nicholas J Mohan

Benjamin Hudson Murray

Jose L Olivera

Jiannuo  Pei

Jessica A Reslan

Alfonso E Rivas

Kevin  Robertson

Daniel  Rose

Hongyi  Ruan

Alexander  Segarra

Ritwik  Takkar

Shu  Wang

Ryan  Wolff

Renjie  Xu

Andy  Zheng

Xiong Feng  Zhu

Computer Science

Aashutosh  Acharya

Aaron  Alakkadan

Genesis  Alvarez

Kwaku  Amofah-Boafo

Garret W Babick

Simon C Barley

Giovanna Elizabeth Barsalona

Julia R Barucky

Samantha E Bastien

Dazhi  Bi

Maxwell William Hans Bockmann

Joshua Jordan Boucher

Dane B Brazinski

Bryan Bladimir Bueno Reyes

Bryce  Cable

Christopher Manuel Calderon Suarez

Liam M Calnan

Megan J Campbell

Benjamin Elliott Canfield

Ta’Yea A Cano

Yuecheng  Cao

Abby  Chapman

Jackie  Chen

Kelvin  Chen

Siyu  Chen

Xinglin  Chen

Yixing  Chen

Yuhao  Chen

Doung Lan  Cheung

Season  Chowdhury

Konstantinos  Chrysoulas

Melissa  Chu

Bram H Corregan

Matthew  Cufari

Ryan Matthew Czirr

Otitodirichukwu Oto  Darl Uzu

Salvatore  DeDona

Rudolph  DelFavero

William Stuart Devitt

Matthew E Dickson

Ting  Dong

Russell Carl Doucet

Christopher  Edmonds

Xueyan  Feng

Nathan B Fenske

Lucas Kuebler Fox

Jeremy  Gavrilov

Grant Thomas Gifford

Brianna S Gillfillian

Brian J Giusti

Justin S Glou

Justin  Gluska

Dayong  Gu

Athanasios  Hadjidimoulas

Erika R Hall

Andrew  Hamann

Jillian Elizabeth Handrahan

Taisei  Hashimoto

Zitao  He

Miranda Rose Heard

Karen  Herrera

Wendy  Hesser

Cameron  Hoechst

Nicholas A Hoffis

Laurel  Howell

Jacob  Howlett

Natalie  Huang

Xuanye  Huang

Nathakorn  Jitngamplang

Austin Dean Johnson

Michael Wesley Jones

Alan  Jos

Aarya Tara Kaphley

Cynthia Sze Nga  Kar

Jaehun  Kim

Ekaterina  Kladova

Jared Michael Kozak

Polina  Kozyreva

Miksam  Kurumbang

Rami L Kuttab

Eric C Lee

Gaeun  Lee

Janet Jihoo Lee

Andy  Li

Hao  Li

Jiaqi  Li

Modi  Li

Rick M Li

Ruowen  Li

Ziqi  Li

Arvin  Lin

Haochen  Lin

Chang  Liu

Erxi  Liu

Jiaming  Liu

Jing  Liu

Junzhang  Liu

Steven  Liu

Yuyuan  Liu

Yiheng  Lu

Runzhi  Ma

Hunter O’Neal Malley

Kanoa  Matton

Anthony Louis Mazzacane

Noah  Mechnig-Giordano

Jose R Mendoza

Yiheng  Meng

Preston  Mohr

Thomas J Montfort

Gregory Philip Morneault

Jacob  Morrison

Jovanni Nicholas Mosca

Chenxi  Mu

Andi  Muhaxheri

Paige C Mundie

Phuc Nguyen  Nguyen

Kayla  Nieto

Carlyn M O’Leary

Maduakolam  Onyewu

Maya  Ostoin

Daniel  Pae

William Anderson Palin

Xiaofeng  Pan

Yulin  Pan

Michael J Panighetti

Joshua S Park

Jun Hyoung  Park

Brian Joseph Pellegrino

Siwei  Peng

Anthony  Perna

Duy  Phan

Fiona Colleen Powers Beggs

Shane Michael Race

Alexis Hope Ratigan

Maxwell Johnson Reed

Christopher  Rhodes

Lauryn Ashley Rivers

Julia R Ruiz

Sadikshya  Sanjel

Yousaf  Shahid

Huahao  Shang

Benjamin William Smrtic

Yijie  Song

Jeremy P Stabile

Kevin  Sullivan

Tasfia  Sultana

Mohammad Murtaza Ali Syed

Louanges Essohana Marlene Takou-Ayaoh

Melissa Li Tang

Rae  Tasker

Jonathan Ezra Thomas

Kyra Danielle Thomas

Griffin E Timm

Maxwell D Townsend

Brendan J Treloar

Fiona Mirabella Tubiana

Courtney Patricia Tuozzo

Randy C Vargas

Anthony Michael Verdone

Bermalyn Maricel  Vicente

Christopher Mark Vinciguerra

Tristan C Waddell

Puxuan  Wang

Ruobing  Wang

Zicheng  Wang

Robert  Ward

Daniel  Weaver

Jack Andrew Willis

Nolan Gabriel Willis

Ethan  Wong

Sio Iok  Wong

Tianyi  Wu

Zhiang  Wu

Zongxiu  Wu

Yurui  Xiang

Yujie  Xu

Jinyang  Xue

Chen  Yang

Chen  Yang

Jintao  Yang

Jishuo  Yang

Rory  Yang

Yisheng  Yang

Stella R Yaunches

Elin J Yaworski

Linsong  You

Yulun  Zeng

Chengyuan  Zhang

Liaotianbao  Zhang

Rixiang  Zhang

Weikun  Zhang

Liuyu  Zhou

Mochen  Zhou

Yixuan  Zhou

Ziying  Zhou

Raymond  Zhu

Sida  Zhu

Joseph Patrick Zoll

Engineering Undeclared

Olivia R Conlin

Andrew J Esposito

Elliane Reut Greenberg

Nicholas John Jacobs

Gavin Thomas Macisaac

Sean R Maddock

Sean  O’toole

Eric  Rodriguez

Haoran  Wang

Xinyi  Wang

Carly J Ward

Abigail Meghan Wischerath

Haven M Wittmann

Electrical Engineering

Mohammed A Aljohani

Tianle  Bu

Kevin E Buciak

Vincent Alec Camarena

Arianna Maxine Cameron

Yuang  Cao

Mingfu  Chen

Shengran  Cheng

Brendan Robert Ciarlone

Eli Aiden Clark

Nicholas Shawn Connolly

Alex Lev Cramer

Trevonne  Davis

Nicholas  Fazzone

John Charles Garcia

Justin P Geary

Matthew R Gelinas

Christopher  Gill

Jose I Ginorio

Jack Orlando Guida

Emerson  Iannone

Qingwen  Jia

Michael Matthew Kelly

Han Gyul  Kwon

Jemma  Mallia

Liam Fuller Marcato

Tyler Sean Marston

Zixun Nian  Nian

Kylie Elizabeth Nikolaus

Julia  Pepin

Stephen Joseph Rogers

Gilberto E Ruiz

Roberto Alexander Salazar-Ramirez

Jenna Mei Stapleton

Luke J Terris

Jared William Welch

Abigail  Wile

Zheyuan  Zhang

Environmental Engineering

Ana Cristina  Baez Gotay

Luke M Borden

Benjamin R Cavarra

Evan James Cibelli

Cambre Rae Codington

Elizabeth Bryant Cultra

Cameron Nicole Edwards

Anna  Feldman

Allyson  Greenberg

Jessenia Paola Guzman

Brady E Hartnett

Christopher Graham Harvey

Anna M Holdosh

Eva Rose Kamman

Abigail Rose King

Nicholas Colin Axel Kohl

Birch  Lazo-Murphy

Audrey B Liebhaber

Carleigh A Lutz

Kevin A Lynch

Molly M Matheson

Matthew Edward Nosalek

Yongfang  Qi

Kaura Yanse Reyes

Mary H Schieman

Noah Michael Sherman

Ian  Storrs

Husna M Tunje

Jacob M Tyler

Maria Antonia  Villegas Botero

Savannah Marie Wujastyk

Qiuyu  Zhou

Reilly  Zink

Mechanical Engineering

Owyn Phillip Adams

Joshua Carl Arndt

Timothy G Arnold

Arda  Arslan

Michael James Battin Jr

Rachael O Beresford

Renee Allison Brogley

Arnaud  Buard

Meaghan Patricia Loan Burns

Ryan G Burns

Tyler  Burns

Adrian L Caballero

Alexander Joseph Callo

Joseph Timothy Capra

Caleigh J Casey

Rishov  Chatterjee

Artur  Chuvik

Santiago  Correa

Samuel Joseph Corrigan

Cooper P Crone

Peter M Daniels

David Matthew Denneen

Madeline  Doyle

Katherine Grace Driscoll

Henry C Duisberg

Griffin Thomas Estes

Luke Samuel Fink

Andrew John Gagan

Clinton Edward Farina Garrahan

Samuel Ryan Getman

Derrick Edward Goll

Emily Ann Greaney

Daniel Robert Greene

David M Griffin

Connor  Hayes

Melissa Jane Hiller

Elliott J Holdosh

Yongsong  Huang

John Christopher Inzinga

Nicholas W Jebaily

Zhao  Jin

Dong Myeong  Kang

Daniel Jacob Kenney

Finnian James Kery

Teagan L Kilian

Cherry  Kim

Savannah Mae Kreppein

Elizabeth Marcy Kretzing

John  Larkin

Lily  Larkin

Peter  Le Porin

Samuel Robert Livingston

Honorata  Lubecka

Bei  Luo

Katherine Elizabeth Macbain

Ryan Patrek Martineau

Ryan A Melick

Sarah Ann Michael

Georgios  Michopoulos

Leilah  Miller

Wiley Robert Moslow

Allison  Mullen

Yuanhao  Nong

Beau M Norris

Aidan T O’Brien

Nicholas Joseph Papaleo

Scott  Reyes

Aidan  Riederich

Colin  Santangelo

Nathan  Schnider

Shane M Sefransky

William Kaspar Sherfey

Jake Matthew Sheridan

Zachary Ryan Shuler

Eric  Silfies

Nathaniel  Slabaugh

Griffin  Smith

Owen Nicholas Smith

Austin James Sumner

Yiyuan  Sun

Matthew K Swanson

Ethan William Tracey

Evan R Tulsky

Nicholas Erik Vestergaard

Taj Asim Whitney

Michael  Wong

Tszho  Wong

Sean T Wuestman

Ruohan  Xu

Maxwell James Yonkers

Xiaoqing  Yu

Systems & Information Science

Sean  Chen

Ryan Thomas Congdon

Yiyang  Dai

Anuj P Gupta

Connor W Gurnham

Rodcliff  Hall

Skyler Marie Hall

Stacy  Kim

Mitchell F Liang

Anthony  Moon

Niara A Phoenix

College of Engineering and Computer Science Honored by the American Society for Engineering Education’s Diversity Recognition Program

Syracuse University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science received bronze level status by the American Society for Engineering Education’s (ASEE) Diversity Recognition Program. The program’s goal is to help engineering, engineering technology, and computing programs promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in member colleges and ultimately in the workplace.

“I am thrilled that our collective efforts to support the college’s strategic goals, and the DEI advancements in our policies, procedures, practices and programs, positioned Syracuse University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science to be among select best in class institutions who received this national recognition,” said Assistant Dean for Inclusive Excellence Karen Davis.

Syracuse University’s bronze status from the ASEE is valid for three years and begins in 2021. The ASEE says timetables for silver and gold recognition will be posted in the future.

Innovation & Entrepreneurship at Syracuse University Webinar

A discussion between the Executive Director of the Blackstone LaunchPad, Linda Dickerson Hartsock, and aerospace engineering and Invent@SU alumna Kayla Simon ’19 about the many ways Syracuse University supports students in designing, prototyping and pitching their new businesses.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Faculty Profile: Mary Beth Monroe

Name: Mary Beth Monroe

Title: Assistant Professor

Research Topics:

  • Shape memory polymer foam hemostats for hemorrhage control in gunshot wounds
  • Antimicrobial shape memory polymer hydrogels for Crohn’s fistula treatment
  • Shape memory polymer hydrogel chronic wound dressings

Why did you chose to be part of the Orange Family?

I was drawn to BMCE at SU in large part because of the people. My colleagues are easy to talk with, fun, and supportive of me as a researcher, teacher, and human. The faculty in BMCE are well-balanced; they do great research and teaching while maintaining interesting hobbies and spending time with their families.

I also love the lab space within the Syracuse Biomaterials Institute. It is the perfect place to carry out my research on shape memory polymer-based biomaterials.

Finally, Syracuse is such a great place to live. As a native Texan, I think that the snow is beautiful, and winter activities are really fun. I also enjoy having distinct seasons. There are so many amazing parks, waterfalls, and activities in the area that allow us to explore outside year-round.

What is you advice for incoming freshman?

Get to know your professors! As I mentioned above, the BMCE faculty are interesting and fun, and we are all here because we love students. Show up to office hours, get involved in student organizations, and do undergraduate research (it’s never too early to join a research lab!) so that you can get to know us. It will make you more successful in college and as you choose a long-term career.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Faculty Profile – Viktor J. Cybulskis

Name: Viktor J. Cybulskis

Title: Assistant Professor of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering

Research Topics: Heterogeneous Catalysis, Zeolite Synthesis, Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms, Chemicals Production and Environmental Remediation

Why you chose to be part of the Orange Family? From my very first interactions with Syracuse faculty, staff, and students I felt welcomed and like a valued member of the Orange community. The supportive culture, contagious energy, and exciting campus initiatives, such as the cross-disciplinary research clusters, make Syracuse the ideal place to launch a career as a new faculty member.

What advice do you have for incoming freshman? Be like a sponge and soak up as much as you can from your experiences here. Involve yourself beyond the classroom by getting to know your professors and learning about the latest advancements in your field of study. You never know what areas or topics may resonate with you and spark your interests for a lifetime to come.

Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Professor Shikha Nangia Selected as Associate Editor for the ACS Applied Bio Materials Journal

Biomedical and chemical engineering Professor Shikha Nangia was selected as the associate editor for the ACS Applied Bio Materials journal.

ACS Applied Bio Materials is an interdisciplinary journal publishing original research covering all aspects of biomaterials and biointerfaces including and beyond the traditional biosensing, biomedical and therapeutic applications.

“It is my immense pleasure to join the editorial board of ACS Applied Bio Materials,” said Nangia. “I wish to use this opportunity to contribute to the scientific community and boost Syracuse University’s research in biomaterials.”

Nangia is an accomplished researcher who most recently has been studying the blood-brain barrier which blocks toxins, as well as crucial medications, from entering the brain. Her research group, which includes undergraduate and graduate students alike, uses computer modeling to identify ways to open and close the blood-brain barrier to deliver medical treatment to the brain non-invasively.

Chemical Engineering Alumni Profile: Jen Chen ’16

Name: Jen Chen

Current Job Title/Industry: Quality Operations Supervisor, Estee Lauder Companies / Cosmetic Industry

Major at SU: Chemical Engineering

Minor: Exercise Science, Dance

Graduation Year: 2016

Why did you chose to be part of the Syracuse University family?

I chose SU initially for how pretty the campus was but then I fell in love with SU for everything they had to offer.  Let’s be honest, a Chemical Engineering curriculum is not the easiest to accomplish but what made it attainable was the support you have from the faculty, staff and, most importantly, your peers.  I was attracted by the architecture but fell in love with the people.

Were you part of any clubs or organizations on campus?

  • Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers (SASE)
  • Pathfinders
  • Career Ambassadors
  • Off-Campus and Commuter Services – Community Ambassador
  • Resident Advisor for Summer Start
  • Study Abroad Hong Kong

Advice for incoming freshman?

Take every opportunity to try new things.  You never know what you might find.

If I could go back, I would have studied abroad more or taken the opportunity to do so over the summers as the programs are well organized and there are so many places to go.

Sustainable Energy Production

Sustainable production, storage and transportation of renewable energy are among the greatest challenges of the 21st century. BMCE department has many stimulating research avenues to offer in this arena. The department has identified environmentally benign conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals, sustainable feedstocks and separation techniques for biofuel production and protein/metabolic engineering for biofuel applications as strategic growth areas in which search for new faculty is underway. Many opportunities for collaborative research exist as well with the Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems and the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. In addition, faculty research includes developing efficient chemical routes to the production of diesel fuel and robust manufacturing of nanomaterials for efficient harvesting of solar energy. Examples of specific projects are given below.

Biodiesel production

Sustainable biodiesel fuel production will provide a major component to our fuel needs by harnessing feed stocks that do not compete with food sources. These include oils from algae, jatropha seeds, switch grass, animal fats, and animal waste from farms, amongst others. The Tavlarides lab is employing supercritical technology which can be used to extract oils from these sources and are developing a supercritical transesterification (ST) processs technology to convert the oils to biodiesel which includes power co generation. This method avoids many disadvantages of the acid/base catalyzed transesterification methods. ST converts the oil at high temperatures (350-400 oC) and pressures (200-300 bar) at modest residence times (3-10 min) and alcohol to oil molar ratios (6-12). Major advantages of the method are that glycerol decomposition occurs and the byproducts are useful fuel components, and high levels of free fatty acids can be tolerated in the feed. An economic study indicates that the processing costs are ~ half those of the conventional catalytic transesterification methods for a 5 million gallon per year plant capacity. The Tavlarides research group intend to build a pilot plant to demonstrate the process and resolve design issues. Ongoing and future studies include modeling the thermodynamic properties, kinetic studies of the SC reactions, extraction of lipids from algae, reactor design studies, and plant design issues.

Representative publications

Deshpande, A., Anitescu, G., Rice, P. A., Tavlarides, L. L. Supercritical Biodiesel Production and Power Cogeneration: Technical and Economic Feasibilities. Bioresource Technology (2009), 101(6), March , 1834-1843, 2010.

Anitescu, G., Tavlarides L. L. Integrated Multistage Supercritical Technology to Produce High Quality Vegetable Oils and Biofuels. (Syracuse University), Intl. Patent Appl. WO 2008101200 A2 20080821, Sept.18, 2009.

Anitescu, G., Tavlarides L. L. Integrated Multistage Supercritical Technology to Produce High Quality Vegetable Oils and Biofuels. (Syracuse University), Intl. Patent Appl. WO 2008101200 A2 20080821, Sept. 18, 2009.

Marulanda, V. F., Anitescu, G., Tavlarides, L. L. Biodiesel Fuels through a Continuous Flow Process of Chicken Fat Supercritical Transesterification. Energy & Fuels (2009), 24(1),255-260, 2010.

Nanomaterials for Thin Film Photovoltaics

Harnessing Sun’s energy for powering our planet has long been a dream of scientists and engineers. Despite the universal appeal and growing usage of solar energy systems across the globe, notably in developing economies, the efficiency of energy conversion has remained well below desirable levels for commercial installations. This is especially a major concern for new generation photovoltaics, which utilize a thin film (~ 1 micron thick) of the photoactive material. In this case, traditional light trapping techniques such as optical gratings (~ several microns) employed for cells based on bulk photoconductors are not applicable. Metallic nanocomposites offer much promise in efficient and cost-effective solar energy harvesting especially for thin film photocells. The central idea is to exploit the plasmonic interaction between electromagnetic waves and the localized oscillations of the free electron gas density at the nanoparticle-dielectric interface. From a renewable energy perspective, plasmonics principles can be used to tailor the spectral response of a material to fit applications such as broadband solar absorption and photo-bioreactor design. This is accomplished by manipulating the particle size, aspect ratio and volume fraction as well as utilizing hybridization techniques (e.g. core-shell materials, multi-metal composites). Research in this area focuses on two aspects of the problem: (i) the design and optimization of such materials and (ii) robust and economically viable manufacturing routes for such materials.

Representative publications

  1. Garcia, R. Kalyanaraman & R. Sureshkumar, Nonlinear optical properties of multi-metal nanocomposites in a glass matrix, J. Phys. B-Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics, 42, 175401 (2009)

Genetic engineering and biofilm engineering for improved biofuel production

One major challenge in biofuel production by microbial fermentation is the toxicity of the products. Ren lab is interested in improving microbial solvent tolerance through genetic engineering and biofilm engineering. Such systems are ideal for understanding bacterial solvent tolerance and for economical production of regenerative biofuels.

Biofuel Production

  1. Collaborative Research: Rational design of bifunctional catalysts for the conversion of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone

    The Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program in the Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems at the National Science Foundation supports Professor Andreas Heyden from the University of South Carolina and Professor Jesse Q. Bond from Syracuse University to establish the underlying science that can make feasible the production of the lignocellulosic biomass-derived platform chemical, γ-valerolactone (GVL), on a commercial scale. GVL is a promising and extremely flexible intermediate, from which numerous desirable end-products can be obtained. As such it provides pathways to renewable transportation fuels, polymers, and specialty chemicals. Despite a myriad of applications for GVL, its large scale production is not yet established, owing largely to difficulties associated with the purification of its immediate precursor, levulinic acid (LA), which is readily prepared from many classes of lignocellulosic biomass (agricultural residues, cellulose fines, urban paper waste, etc.) through dilute acid hydrolysis. In the present state of the art, LA must undergo a costly purification scheme prior to conversion to GVL. The research performed in this program intends to streamline this step, thus making the entire strategy more industrially relevant. Using a combined computational and experimental approach, we will obtain fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanism of the mild, heterogeneously catalyzed hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of LA to GVL over Ru/C and RuRe/C catalysts in both aqueous and dilute sulfuric acid solutions. We aim to understand the specific effects of sulfuric acid on the reaction mechanism and the role of Re in bimetallic catalysts. Further, a microkinetic model will be developed to permit identification of rate and selectivity determining steps as well as practical activity and selectivity descriptors that can be transferred to the design of realistic supported bimetallic catalysts. Successful outcomes will demonstrate that, bimetallic catalysts can offer superior performance in the selective conversion of LA to GVL in the harsh environments characteristic of biomass conversion (e.g., dilute sulfuric acid). Further, we anticipate that results from tightly integrated experimental and computational studies will allow rational design of novel catalysts for HDO of LA under realistic industrial conditions.
  2. Design of an intensified, modular system enabling production of jet fuel from γ-valerolactone.

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) is supporting research directed toward streamlining the efficiency of jet fuel production from bio-based intermediates. Our primary focus in this program is the design of stable solid acids catalysts that allow process intensification of decarboxylation and subsequent oligomerization of γ-valerolactone (GVL) and its derivatives. Coke-deposition is problematic during high-temperature decarboxylation of valerolactone, leading to rapid catalyst deactivation and frequent regeneration cycles. By developing an understanding of the relationship between surface acidity and coke formation, we can support the design of targeted materials that deliver stable on-stream operation, minimize downtime, and improve the energy efficiency of jet-fuel production through this strategy.

Faculty

Nanotechnology

In nanoscale science and engineering research one seeks novel and robust ways for the manipulation of biological or synthetic matter with at least one of the dimensions smaller than typically 100 nm. Examples include synthesis of novel materials via molecular self-assembly and fabrication of devices by nanolithography. Technological impact of such research ranges from medicine and sustainable production of chemicals/fuels to THz information processing and renewable energy harvesting. At Syracuse University, BMCE faculty research in this area focuses on the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured materials for biomedical, optoelectronic, catalytic and renewable energy harvesting applications, developing computational and experimental approaches to explore the mechanisms of molecular self-assembly and investigations of the environmental impacts of nanotechnology. Specific examples of current research projects are:

Nanostructured Interfaces

Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of nanoscale patterns generated by pulsed laser melting of a 4 nm thick Co film deposited on a glass substrate via e-beam evaporation. The patterns result from hydrodynamic instabilities in the molten metal film. A variety of metals can be patterned by using this technique. Such nanostructured interfaces have unique optical and magnetic properties which can be tuned by their size, shape and length scale (collaboration with Dr. Kalyanaraman, University of Tennessee, Knoxville).

For further details, see:

  1. Trice, C. Favazza, D.G. Thomas, H.G. Garcia, R. Kalyanaraman, R. Sureshkumar, A novel self-organization mechanism in ultrathin liquid films: theory and experiment, Phys. Rev. Lett., 101, 017802 (2008)

Environmental Impact of Nano ZnO

ZnO NPs (20 nm diameter) in presence of bacterial cells: in aqueous solution (C) where the nanoparticles agglomerate and do not impact the cell wall appreciably and after electrospray (D) where the individual NPs attack the cell. The latter scenario would correspond to aerosol mode of exposure (collaboration with Dr. Yinjie Tang, Washington University in Saint Louis).

ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used as pigments, semiconductors, sunscreens, and food additives. To determine the potential eco-toxicity of ZnO NPs, researchers have investigated their toxicological properties, fate, and transport in the environment. Injurious effects of ZnO NPs upon a variety of organisms in aquatic environments have recently been reported. Several studies indicated that the dissolved Zn2+ from ZnO NPs in the aquatic environment causes these eco-toxicities. Other studies have shown that metal NPs may be more toxic than either their ionic forms or their parent compounds. NPs tend to aggregate in aquatic environments to form micrometer-sized particles, and this state of dispersion reduces the influences of particle size, particle shape, and surface charge on the NPs’ eco-toxicity: see figure below. Further, many microorganisms such as Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Escherichia coli secrete extracellular polymeric substrates (EPS) which can inhibit the binding of NPs onto the cell. The focus is the study is to understand the effect of different modes of exposure (aqueous medium, aerosol) on the eco-toxicity of NPs.

For more details, see:

  1. Wu, Y. Wang, Y. Lee, A. Horst, Z. Wang, D. Chen, R. Sureshkumar & Y. Tang, Comparative Eco-toxicities of Nano-ZnO Particles under Aquatic and Aerosol Exposure Modes, Environmental Science and Technology

Nanotoxicity

Concerns of nanotoxicity caused by nanoparticle-cell interactions are becoming increasingly important as the applications of nanoparticles continue to grow. There is significant interest in correlating the properties of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, and chemical functionality to their toxicity to biological systems. A recent study by Nangia and Sureshkumar showed that simple shape and charge modifications of chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles can cause tremendous change in their uptake by the cell. Using high-performance molecular dynamics simulations, interactions of charged nanoparticles of six distinct shapes (cone, cube, rod, rice, pyramid, and sphere) were performed with a model cell membrane. The results indicated that depending on nanoparticle shape and surface functionalization charge, the translocation rates can span over 60 orders of magnitude.

Figure: The translocation of nanoparticles is highly shape-dependent with rice-shaped particle that penetrates on microsecond time-scale, versus other shapes like sphere, pyramid, cone, rod, and cube that occur on much longer scales.

Faculty

Multiple Phase Systems

Multi-phase systems are commonly encountered in chemical and biological systems. While the analytical framework (e.g. the equations describing the transport of mass, momentum, or energy) is relatively well established for the single-phase systems, much needs to be done for multi-phase systems. Our approach is to build a tool box consisting of experimental (including flow visualization), theoretical, and numerical simulation techniques that may be used to understand variety of multiphase systems. Given below is a brief description of some of the multi-phase systems examined by the researchers in the department. (See also Complex fluids for additional examples.)

Acoustic Probe for Characterizing Suspensions

Monitoring the amount of solids in slurries flowing through a pipe is important to quality control in process industry. The figure on the left shows a device that uses attenuation of ultrasonic sound waves through slurry to determine the solid content. Small amounts of bubbles that are often present in slurries normally pose serious challenge in the use of ultrasound technology but we have been able to develop software that uses theoretical understanding of acoustics of three-phase systems to filter out the noise introduced by the bubbles if present, and yield the estimates of solids on a continuous basis. This is illustrated by the figure on the right in which bubbles are introduced in a flowing slurry so that overall attenuation of sound increases as indicated by the upper curve. A theory for removing the noise by bubbles allows us to obtain the concentration of particles as indicated by the lower curve. This method forms the basis for a pending patent application (U. S. Patent 0245137 by Tavlarides, Norato, Shcherbakov, and Sangani ).

Bone Cements

Nanosphere containing two-solution bone cement after polymerization and fracture. Note the highly packed and uniform nanospheres of cross-linked PMMA (Taken from Rodrigues et al., JBMR-B, 2010)

Two solution bone cement is an innovation in the formulation and properties of orthopedic bone cement used to fix total joint replacements in bone or to perform vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty (i.e., repair of osteoporotic spine). These cements are acrylic based and consist of high-viscosity mixtures of monomer, linear polymer, surface modified cross-linked polymer beads (including nanobeads of approximately 300 nm) which have brush polymer and/or reactive moieties. One aspect of this multiphase material is its non-linear rheometric behavior. This behavior, which is thixotropic and pseudoplastic, has important consequences for the delivery and positioning of the cement in bone. The surgeon wants a cement that is doughy, yet can pass through a small gage needle with low force and then can set up quickly as a stiff material once it reaches its site in the body. In one version of this cement, uniform nanospheres are added to reduce the overall monomer level while maintaining the appropriate viscosity.

Recent Publications

Rodrigues, DC, Gilbert, JL, Hasenwinkel, JM, “Two-solution Bone Cements with Cross-linked Micro- and Nano-particles for Vertebral Fracture Applications: Effects of Zircomium Dioxide Content on the Material and Setting Properties”, JBMR-B, Vol. 92, No 1, Jan. 2010, p 12-23.

Rodrigues, DC, Gilbert, JL, Hasenwinkel, JM, “Pseudoplasticity and Setting Properties of Two-Solution Bone Cement Containing Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Microspheres and Nanospheres for Kyphoplasty and Vertebroplasty”, J. Biomed. Mat Res Part-B, Vol. 91 No(1), Oct. 2009, p 248-256.

Supercritical fuel sprays

Clockwise: hexane at 24 oC; hexane-CO2 at 24 oC, hexane-CO2 at 90 oC; hexane-CO2 at 120 oC; hexane-CO2 at 135 oC; hexane-CO2 at 155 oC.

Shown in these figures are the effects of temperature at constant pressure of 413 bar on the sprays of hexane–carbon dioxide solutions injected in ambient air. At higher temperatures, close to the supercritical conditions for the mixture of hexane and carbon dioxide, the spray fuel–CO2–air becomes mostly homogeneous. Such homogeneity is highly desirable to improve the efficiency of the fuel combustion and decrease the concentrations of NOx, particulate matter, and other undesirable pollutants.

Recent Publications

Anitescu, G., Lin, R-H., Tavlarides, L. L. Preparation, Injection and Combustion of Supercritical Fuels; Poster P-2 presented at Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference, Dearborn, MI, August 3–6, 2009.

Anitescu, G.; Tavlarides, L. L.; Geana, D. Phase Transitions and Thermal Behavior of Fuel-Diluent Mixtures. Energy & Fuels 2009, 23, 3068–3077.

Numerical simulations and theory

Numerical simulation techniques that account for detailed particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions for variety of particle-scale physics phenomena are developed by Sangani and co-workers. As a result of the efficient algorithms that are developed over last two decades it is possible to carry out large scale simulations of tens of thousands of particles. The results of simulations have enabled us to develop theories

Supercritical fuel sprays

Clockwise: hexane at 24 oC; hexane-CO2 at 24 oC, hexane-CO2 at 90 oC; hexane-CO2 at 120 oC; hexane-CO2 at 135 oC; hexane-CO2 at 155 oC.

Shown in these figures are the effects of temperature at constant pressure of 413 bar on the sprays of hexane–carbon dioxide solutions injected in ambient air. At higher temperatures, close to the supercritical conditions for the mixture of hexane and carbon dioxide, the spray fuel–CO2–air becomes mostly homogeneous. Such homogeneity is highly desirable to improve the efficiency of the fuel combustion and decrease the concentrations of NOx, particulate matter, and other undesirable pollutants.

Recent Publications

Anitescu, G., Lin, R-H., Tavlarides, L. L. Preparation, Injection and Combustion of Supercritical Fuels; Poster P-2 presented at Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference, Dearborn, MI, August 3–6, 2009.

Anitescu, G.; Tavlarides, L. L.; Geana, D. Phase Transitions and Thermal Behavior of Fuel-Diluent Mixtures. Energy & Fuels 2009, 23, 3068–3077.

Numerical simulations and theory

Numerical simulation techniques that account for detailed particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions for variety of particle-scale physics phenomena are developed by Sangani and co-workers. As a result of the efficient algorithms that are developed over last two decades it is possible to carry out large scale simulations of tens of thousands of particles. The results of simulations have enabled us to develop theories for multi-phase systems.

Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Composites

Figure: SEM micrographs of uncoated carbon fiber (a, x 2000) and polypyrrole-coated carbon fibers: (b) after 10 minutes of coating (b, x 2000), after 60 minutes of coating (c, x 2000; d, x 10000). Reaction conditions: [Pyrrole] = 0.2 M; [H2SO4] = 0.1 M; Current Density10 mA/cm2). From Bin, Sureshkumar and Kardos, Chemical Engineering Science, 56, 6563-75 (2001)

Carbon fibers are used as reinforcements in advanced composites because of their excellent specific mechanical properties. However, adhesion between the carbon fibers and the polymeric matrix is usually weak. Hence, surface treatment methods are required to improve fiber–matrix bonding and to efficiently transmit the applied load through the matrix to the fibers. Typical industrial treatments include gas phase oxidation, ozone or plasma etching, electrochemical oxidation, whiskerization, and polymer coating. Modification of carbon fibers by applying electropolymerized coatings has attracted considerable attention. In order to improve the adhesion between the carbon fibers and the matrix, polymer coatings are applied directly onto the fiber surface by electropolymerization. Advantages of this technique over other traditional surface treatment methods include superior wetability of the individual fiber filaments in a bundle, control of the structures and properties of the coatings through control of monomer functionality and electropolymerization parameters, accessibility of the state-of-the-art electroanalytical techniques to study reactions, and relatively low processing cost. Moreover, electropolymerization appears to be a suitable process to maximize the impact strength and fracture toughness, while retaining the required optimum levels of other mechanical properties. Our work has focused on identifying process-morphology relationships in electropolymerization of C fibers with polypyrrole.

Faculty

Molecular Biotechnology

Molecular Biotechnology applies modern techniques of molecular biology in both fundamental and applied research. Examples of such powerful tools include DNA mutagenesis, DNA sequencing, RNA interference, stem cell technology, immunological methods, protein engineering, genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, gene therapy and cloning techniques. These technologies offer exciting opportunities to understand and control complex systems at the molecular level for applications in healthcare, environmental protection, biofuel production and biosecurity. In Ren lab, for example, molecular biotechnology is being applied in a variety of research projects such as tracking bacterial cells using molecular cloning and bioimaging, sensor development for pathogen detection, novel technology for controlling drug resistant infections.

Representative publications

Jiachuan Pan, Ali Adem Bahar, Haseeba Syed, and Dacheng Ren. “Reverting antibiotic tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 persister cells by (Z)-4-bromo-5-(bromomethylene)-3-methylfuran-2(5H)-one”. PLoS ONE. 7(9): e45778. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0045778. (2012).

Shuyu Hou, Huan Gu, Cassandra Smith and Dacheng Ren*, “Microtopographic patterns affect Escherichia coli biofilm formation on polydimethylsiloxane surfaces”. Langmuir. 27: 2686-2691 (2011).

Shuyu Hou, Zhigang Liu, Neville R. Kallenbach, and Dacheng Ren, ” Effects of Trp- and Arg-Containing Antimicrobial-Peptide Structure on Inhibition of Escherichia coli Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation”. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 76: 1967-1974 (2010).

Miao Duo, Mi Zhang, Yan-Yeung Luk and Dacheng Ren, “Inhibition of Candida albicans Growth by Brominated Furanones”. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology. 85: 1551-1563 (2010).

Shuyu Hou, Erik A. Button, Ricky Lei Wu, Yan-Yeung Luk and Dacheng Ren, “Prolonged Control of Patterned Biofilm Formation by Bio-inert Surface Chemistry”. Chemical Communication. 2009: 1207-1209.

Faculty

Mathematical and Numerical Analysis

The properties and collective response to stimuli of biological and chemical systems often depend on physico-chemical and/or biological interactions that occur at disparate length and time scales. For instance, when a macromolecule (say a polymer with radius of gyration ~ nm) in solution is subjected to flow deformation, it can uncoil and orient in the flow direction. This causes the solution itself to behave differently in a macroscopic sense, e.g., flow aligned molecules can “slide” past each other more easily, hence the viscosity of the solution could decrease as flow deformation (shear rate) is increased. The purpose of Multiscale Modeling and Simulation (MMS) in this context is to device a self-consistent numerical simulation that would combine say a mesoscopic or “micro” simulator (e.g. Brownian Dynamics) that would “track” polymer configurations with a continuum-level or “macro” solver (e.g. Finite Element) for the conservation laws that represent the overall mass and momentum balance for the flowing system. The advantage of such an approach is that one can predict the additional stresses produced by the polymers without resorting to ad hoc closure approximations from the knowledge of polymer configurations obtained from the micro simulation. This information is then used in the overall force balance in the macro solver. The macro solver in turn updates the micro on the velocity distribution. Hence the method is self-consistent. Such numerical simulations together with sound theoretical framework for bridging the behavior of a system at one length or time scale to the dynamics at other scale is the key to understanding and predicting behavior of complex systems. Further, MMS is important to modern process and product design since it allows one to establish structure-processing-property relationships.

MMS can link different scales ranging from the quantum-mechanical, atomistic, molecular, mesoscopic and the continuum: see Figure above for a hierarchy of computational techniques. In the BMCE department Sureshkumar, Sangani and coworkers focus on developing efficient algorithms to explore the structure and dynamics of polymeric fluids, self-assembled phases of surfactants (micelles), bacterial biofilms, bubbly liquids and particulate/fiber/colloidal suspensions.

Representative publications

  1. Koppol, R. Sureshkumar & B. Khomami, Anomalous friction drag behavior of mixed kinematics flows of viscoelastic polymer solutions: a multiscale simulation approach, J. Fluid Mech., 631, 231-253 (2009).

Faculty

Drug Delivery

Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery

A new breakthrough technology is emerging in cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention that utilizes novel “smart” nanoparticles that are capable targeting only the cancerous cell. The smart nanoparticles are designed to have a multilayer assembly with a drug loaded core and highly sensitive shells that are triggered by the biological signatures of cancer. The efficacy of the nanoparticles and their interaction with biological systems is of significant interest. The Nangia lab is developing state-of-the-art computational methods to design novel drug carriers for improved selectivity, targeted drug release, and cellular drug uptake efficacy with molecular-level accuracy. The specific goals of the research are:

  • Quantitative yield assessment of drug release as a function of pH
  • kinetics of reactions leading to supramolecular disassembly
  • structural and charge dependence on drug loading

Representative publications

Wenjuan Jiang, Juntao Luo, and Shikha Nangia. “Multiscale approach to investigate self-assembly of telodendrimer based nanocarriers for anticancer drug-delivery”. Langmuir. 2015  31, 4270-4280.

  1. 2014 Shi, D. Yuan , Shikha Nangia, G. Xu, K. Lam, and Juntao Luo. “A Structure–Property Relationship Study of the Well-Defined Telodendrimers to Improve Hemocompatibility of Nanocarriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery.”,Langmuir. 2014. 28, 17666–17671.

Faculty

Biomaterials/Tissue Engineering

Biomaterials science is the physical and biological study of materials and their interaction with the biological environment. Tissue engineering uses of a combination of cells, biomaterials, and biochemical and biomechanical factors, individually or in combination, to repair or replace tissues or organs. The Biomedical and Chemical Engineering Department at Syracuse University has a strong and growing emphasis on biomaterials and tissue engineering, and many faculty in the department are members of the recently created Syracuse Biomaterials Institute.

Research in the department includes disciplinary projects in biomaterials and in tissue engineering, as well as interdisciplinary projects at the interface of these two exciting research areas. These projects are nearly universally motivated by the potential to improve human health and well-being. Examples of current biomaterials and tissue engineering projects in the department are listed below:

  • Active Cell Culture
  • Biomineralization
  • Control of bacterial biofilm formation
  • Fragmentation Mechanisms of Bacterial Biofilms of Physiological Relevance
  • Freeform Fabrication of Biomaterials
  • Cartilage Tissue Engineering
  • Micromechanics of Wear of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE)
  • Redox electrochemistry and metallic biocompatibility
  • The reduction half-cell and protein adsorption and interaction
  • Control of cell viability with redox electrochemistry
  • Smart medical devices with electrochemical monitoring
  • Fretting Corrosion of Medical Alloys and Devices
  • Electrochemical Atomic Force Microscopy of Metallic Biomaterials
  • Passive oxide films and their behavior in the biological milieu
  • Performance testing of orthopedic, spinal, and cardiovascular devices
  • Micro- and nano-indentation of polymeric biomaterials and tissue engineered constructs
  • Development of novel two solution bone cements for vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty and joint replacement
  • Modeling polymerization processes, residual stresses and porosity development in bone cements
  • Atomic Force microscopy for biomaterials, proteins, and cells
  • Nanoindentation testing of biomaterials
  • Viscoelastic analysis of nanomechanics
  • Nanoparticle development
  • Failure analysis of retrieved total joint replacements
  • In-vitro testing of corrosion mechanisms in medical devices
  • Fatigue and fracture testing of medical devices

Faculty